Skyfaring

  • by Mark Vanhoenacker
  • Narrated by John Moraitis
  • 12 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

In Skyfaring, airline pilot and flight romantic Mark Vanhoenacker shares his irrepressible love of flying on a journey from day to night, from new ways of mapmaking and the poetry of physics to the names of winds and the nature of clouds. Here, anew, is the simple wonder and transcendent joy of motion and the remarkable new perspectives that height and distance bestow on everything we love.

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What the Critics Say

"Read it, and you’ll find yourself requesting a window seat every time you fly." (Bookseller)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

I agree with most comments about the narrator

I am a licensed private pilot and travel commercially about 100K miles per year so I am into aviation. That's the entire reason I bought this book. Yet, I found it too boring to finish. Some of this might be the fault of the narrator. I am in agreement with almost all of the other reviewers about this. He over pronounces every syllable. He mispronounces common aviation words, of which the oft reference "altimeter" is the most annoying. I will give him a pass on "Aeroplane" since that is the British way of saying the word. I am not certain how it is spelled out in the print edition

Yes, it is clear that the author truly loves what he does and that does come through in the book. Maybe I will go back and finish it after I finish the current thriller I am listening to, or if I am sitting on one of those many commercial flights and need to take a nap.
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- Warren

Probably a bit longer than necessary

Parts of the book were quite interesting but others went on much too long with lots of repetition.

As to the narrator: The quality control in the making of these audio books comes into serious question. Does anyone listen to what's going on? Others have mentioned altimeter as being a pretty glaring mispronunciation. What about "airplane"? which, as you can imagine is a pretty common word in a book about flying. From the very beginning of the book it's not a two syllable word but a three syllable word. Aer-o-plane is even more disconcerting and abrasive than altimeter. Be warned.
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- Chuck

Book Details

  • Release Date: 04-02-2015
  • Publisher: Whole Story AudioBooks