In Morocco

  • by Edith Wharton
  • Narrated by Anna Fields
  • 4 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

"To step on board a steamer in a Spanish port, and three hours later to land in a country without a guide-book, is a sensation to rouse the hunger of the repletest sight-seer. The sensation is attainable by any one who will take the trouble to row out into the harbour of Algeciras and scramble onto a little black boat headed across the straits...."A classic of travel writing, In Morocco is Edith Wharton's remarkable account of her journey to that country during World War I. With her characteristic sense of adventure, Wharton set out to explore Morocco and its people, traveling by military jeep to Rabat, Moulay Idriss, Fez, and Marrakech, from the Atlantic coast to the high Atlas. Along the way, she witnessed religious ceremonies and ritual dances, visited the opulent palaces of the Sultan, and was admitted to the mysterious world of his harem.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

A colorful but dated travelogue

The first three-fourths of the book are a first-person account of Wharton's travel from Tangier to Rabat, Fes, and Marrakech just after the end of the First World War as a guest of the French governor general, Lyautey. The last fourth deals with Moroccan history and art. There are many details that help carry the listener past a predictable array of Orientalist stereotypes.
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- Brad

Prose in the hands of a master!

What did you love best about In Morocco?

Edith Wharton's use of language is beautiful, her descriptions colorful and her experience delightfully presented. Although the visit takes place in a bygone era, the descriptions of people and ceremonies gives a feel for the recent history of this country and for the background of the people still living there.


What was one of the most memorable moments of In Morocco?

Edith Wharton's empathy for those forced into slavery or raised to labor is moving, especially given the time period in which she writes. The descriptive scenes of homage and ceremony are a delightful repast, vivid and yet concise.


What does Anna Fields bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

This is a first person narrative, and as such, it is important that the voice have a real authenticity to it. I found that to be true. I also appreciate that care was taken not to be overly dramatic, thus keeping the narrative moving and contemplative.


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- Eire Stewart

Book Details

  • Release Date: 10-17-2008
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.