Paper Towns

  • by John Green
  • Narrated by Dan John Miller
  • 8 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Quentin Jacobsen has spent a lifetime loving the magnificently adventurous Margo Roth Spiegelman from afar. So when she cracks open a window and climbs back into his life - dressed like a ninja and summoning him for an ingenious campaign of revenge - he follows.
After their all-nighter ends and a new day breaks, Q arrives at school to discover that Margo, always an enigma, has now become a mystery. But Q soon learns that there are clues - and they're for him. Urged down a disconnected path, the closer he gets, the less Q sees of the girl he thought he knew.
Printz medalist John Green returns with the brilliant wit and searing emotional honesty that have inspired a new generation of listeners.


See More Like This

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

John Green Fans Will Enjoy

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

No, my friends don't read YA. However, I would recommend it to an Audible fan of John Green. I enjoyed the explanation for paper towns and the road trip.

Who was your favorite character and why?

I enjoyed the main character the best. I identified with his longing and unrequited love (or obsession).

Which character – as performed by the narrator – was your favorite?

I thought his best was a little over-the-top obnoxious and I didn't care for Margot Roth Spiegelman. I found her selfish.

Read full review

- FanB14 "Short, Simple, No Spoilers"

Pseudovisions and Wild Imagination

John Green's Audibles should be labeled "Warning: Do not drive while listening."

"The Fault in our Stars" (2012) had me sobbing through an entire chapter. Fortunately, I was in really heavy traffic and I was able to slowly follow brake lights ahead of me

On the other hand. I laughed to hard through parts of "Paper Towns" (2008) that I forgot to look at my GPS, drove far past my exit, and ended up late for a meeting with a big grin on my face, instead an appropriately contrite look.

I'm not going to summarize the whole book here. I'm several generations past the target audience, and I'd almost certainly end up condescending and judgmental. Green doesn't deserve that, and neither do his characters Quentin 'Q' Jacobsen and Margo Roth Spiegelman.

So, as a middle aged mom of teenagers, here's what I thought was great about the book:

I like Green's neologisms. I've worked with developers for more than 20 years in California. There so many named, never built grand dreams on maps. California City. Salton Sea. Elegant community names are given, streets are mapped out and maybe graded, lots are sold - but nothing is ever built. Green calls them "pseudovisions" - and that's really the best word for what they are.

Green's subtle, clever nod to American photographer Lillian Virginia Mountweazel (1942 - 1973) added an unexpected dimension to "Paper Towns" that I had fun exploring. I don't think Mountweazel's posthumous contributions, especially to Wikipedia, are recognized often enough.

I also have a confession to make: I managed to make it through almost half a century without the slightest inclination to read Walt Whitman, much less understand his poetry. Or, to be fair - any poetry not written by Edgar Allen Poe, Ray Bradbury, or Maya Angelou. So, yes, I'll be listening to Whitman sometime soon. And I'm guessing I'll really like if. (Audible, wouldn't "Leaves of Grass" be a neat Daily Deal???)

The only problem I'm having now is - well - I keep thinking of great practical jokes. Which, since I'm a litigator and Judges are required to give up all sense of humor when they take the bench, won't ever happen. But at least I can imagine tricks while waiting for my case to be called.

[If this review helped please press YES. Thanks!]
Read full review

- Cynthia "Always moving. Always listening. Always learning. "After all this time?" "Always.""

Book Details

  • Release Date: 10-16-2008
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio