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Publisher's Summary

Was there ever a year in golf like 1960? It was the year that the sport and its vivid personalities exploded on the consciousness of the nation, when the past, present, and future of the game collided. Television, still a new medium, provided a fresh window to this fascinating show and enabled this "rich man's sport" to win over millions of new fans. Here was Arnold Palmer, the working man's hero, "sweating, chain-smoking, shirt-tail flying," winning, it seemed, every tournament with a last-second charge; grim Ben Hogan, Arnie's opposite, the greatest player of the '50s, a perfectionist battling the twin demons of age and nerves; and, making his debut in the big time, a chunky, crewcut college kid who seemed to have the makings of a champion: twenty-year-old Jack Nicklaus.
©1992 Curt Sampson (P)2001 Blackstone Audiobooks
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Trip von Minden on 08-30-13

Good blow-by-blow account of the 1960 Golf Season

I enjoyed reading this book several years ago, and I also enjoyed listening to the audio version just recently. The book is essentially an earlier version of John Feinstein's The Majors centered on the 1960 season. The portraits of Palmer and Nicklaus as well as some of the minor characters are excellent.

It would rate higher if McKee's performance were better. I found his attempts to speak in accents a bit forced. The worst was his Gary Player. Although he did a good Nicklaus.

Overall, it is a good book and worth a listen.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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