Treat Me Like a Customer

  • by Louis Upkins
  • Narrated by Louis Upkins
  • 5 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Do you feel as though you’re doing everything right to provide for your family but sense a growing distance between you and those you love the most? According to entrepreneur Louis Upkins, you may be doing all the right things, but in the wrong order. Using a simple customer service principle, you can learn how to be just as successful at home as you are at work. Fulfill your calling as a parent and spouse by doing what you do so well at work.


See More Like This

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Common sense ideas presented in a novel way

Louis Upkins is a Christian man and has written his book with this target audience in mind. Others can benefit from the general principles that he offers. However, that is his background and it is the history that he draws from in expressing his message.

And his message is simple and largely sensible. We claim that our families are the most important things in our lives, certainly more so than anything that goes on at our jobs. Yet, for many, actions speak louder than words and those actions are that when push comes to shove, the job comes first.

Mr. Upkins message is to bring the customer driven focus that leads to success in business back to the home life - to think in terms of customer service in our dealings with our families. On the surface, it sounds insulting. Surely we should think of our families better than customers. But, digging deeper, the focus of the books is more about using the techniques of customer service to make for more effective relations at home.

Overall, I think the advice is good. In listening to the author, I found myself already doing a lot of what he suggests - much of it seems obvious. Because of that, I find myself sympathetic to the message.

Structurally, I do think the book could actually be a good deal shorter, though it's not a long book to begin with. The introductory section in the beginning tends toward the repetitve. The last section also feels somewhat like filler - notes that the author wants to communicate, but that don't really fit in anywhere else.

The audiobook I listened to features the author doing his own narration. He doesn't have a future as a professional narrator, but reading his own material does give it an honest tone - this advice comes across as something that he really believes in and wants to share.

Overall, a decent read. While I don't think it's entirely original in its ideas, I do think it is original in its approach to presenting them.
Read full review

- A Texan 2

Book Details

  • Release Date: 02-08-2010
  • Publisher: Zondervan