Mindfulness and Psychotherapy

  • by Thich Nhat Hanh
  • 2 hrs and 59 mins
  • Speech

Publisher's Summary

Before you can help others, Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh teaches, you must first bring peace and a deep love of life into your own consciousness. Mindfulness and Psychotherapy was originally created for those in the helping professions, but has proven profoundly helpful to anyone who wants to understand why we are at war with ourselves and one another - and how to mend our conflicts. In a special section on anger, Thich Nhat Hanh sets aside the classic debate about suppression versus expression to offer a radically different way of working with anger that uses techniques of breathing and walking meditation.


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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Author Should Not Have Narrated

Thich Nhat Hanh may have some wonderful things to say, but you can't understand him because his accent is too thick. Even my wife who is Vietnamese could not understand him.
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- Ronald

Expectations interfere ...

Expectations interfere with appreciation of the present.
It is to be regretted that the previous two reviewers had difficulty understanding the speech of Thich Nhat Hanh in this recording.
Our speaker begins with the recommendation: "The practice of buddhist meditation ... is to get the capacity to enjoy peace ... ", and he continues, to say that often we miss the present moment because we are looking for something else. The previous reviewers might have found benefit in taking that to heart.
I would suggest that the previous reviewers might learn from their experience, benefit from the opportunity, by resting in awareness of their struggle with the speech sounds of Thich Nhat Hanh, so they might relax out of that struggle, and find peace and openness to the realities of the moment, the moment in this case being the excellent teaching of Thich Nhat Hanh. As long as one gives one's awareness to the barrier, the difficulty, that is what one will know. That difficulty, that struggle, is not necessary; by bringing struggle to the relationship, one's awareness of the relationship is dominated by the experience of one's own contribution of struggle.
Ironic, that the previous reviewers' need of the teachings interfered with their hearing of the teachings. In such a situation, one might stop trying, stop projecting whatever attempt to understand is not being successful, and rest a few moments in peaceful openness, in simple receptivity, before playing the recording again. Let effort and struggle subside, let the activities of the thinking mind subsite, and receive the teachings with an open heart.
A teacher cannot teach; only, a student can learn.
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- John Steven

Book Details

  • Release Date: 12-17-1999
  • Publisher: Sounds True