• Secret Lives of Stars

  • Scientific American Special Edition
  • By: Scientific American
  • Narrated by: uncredited
  • Length: 2 hrs and 14 mins
  • Periodical
  • Release date: 09-13-05
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Scientific American
  • 4 out of 5 stars 3.8 (55 ratings)

Regular price: $5.95

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Editorial Reviews

This special edition of Scientific American takes a comprehensive look at stars, from their births through their deaths. Some topics covered include the first stars, the early days in the life of a star, solar storms, gamma ray bursts, and the magnetics of stars. The narrator gives a star performance as well. He keeps the pacing and enunciation straightforward, making this audio magazine easy to follow for both armchair and junior astronomers. Listening to issues of Scientific American means you can still pack a lot of learning into a busy day.
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Publisher's Summary

We track these cosmic phenomena through their births, lives, and fiery deaths. The first article tells us about the appearance of the very first stars in the universe. Then, we will learn about the early days in the life of a star, as we track it's progression from dust to giant flaming ball of gas. Also, contrary to conventional wisdom, scientists have discovered that stars can, and often do, collide with each other. We will also hear about solar storms, shock waves from the sun that can endanger Earth¿s satellites and astronauts. Then, some stars are magnetized so intensely, that they alter the very nature of the quantum vacuum. Finally, we learn about the brightest explosions in the universe and black holes.
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    Customer Reviews

    Most Helpful
    5 out of 5 stars
    By Barry J. Marshall on 01-31-08

    Fantastic Cosmic Stuff Well Explained

    This is one of the best books I ever bought. Cosmology like I never knew. Now when I see those Hubble telescope images I know what they are. This is a great book - give me more please - it is too short.

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    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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