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Editorial Reviews

This Scientific American collection of renowned academic articles features Albert Einstein’s watershed April 1950 article on the theory of gravitation, an account of the newly published extension of the generalized theory of relativity against its historical and philosophical background. The other two articles also engage topics of modern physics, including a tribute to the great Einstein written shortly after his death, as well as an in-depth examination of neutrinos. Though these papers include a fair amount of scientific jargon, the come off as anything but dry due to the narrator’s upbeat and energetic delivery.
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Publisher's Summary

Scientific American presents a collection of key scientific essays written by Nobel Prize winners Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, I.I. Rabi, and Leon Lederman. Einstein's essay, "On the Generalized Theory of Gravitation" (originally published in SA, April 1950), is an account of the then-newly published extension of the generalized theory of relativity against its historical and philosophical background. Next are tributes to Einstein upon his death in 1955, written by Niels Bohr, who won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1922, and I.I. Rabi, who won in 1944. Finally, "The Two Neutrino Experiment" by Leon Lederman (originally published in SA, March 1963), an account of the heroic experiment involving a 30-billion volt accelerator, a 10-ton spark chamber, and 45 feet of armor plate that demonstrated that there is not one kind of neutrino, but two. Lederman won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1988. These essays have never before appeared in audio.
©2001 Scientific American
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By David Chadwick on 09-09-09

Beautiful Strangeness Of the Quantum!

Scientific American has in the not so recent past been one of my favorite magazines, however in recent years due to the literary simpification of the publication to suit a wider more diverse audience I have strayed from its pages.
This audible.com delight will be refreshing as well as nostalgic for those readers who can enjoy quantum particle matters, and/or feel the same way about Scientific American as I have expressed in the first Paragraph.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful


By Thomas Collins Jr. on 11-20-06

Nobel Prize Winner:Physics

This is a great look to the history of some of the greatest minds in this and last century. It shows the falibility of of the human mind but where one falls short another takes over and expands on the theory of Unifacation, Black Holes and the Birth of the Universe. A great listen.

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3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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