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Publisher's Summary

In this issue:
"The Inflation Debate": Our best explanation of how the universe evolved must be fixed – or replaced.
"The Enemy Within": A new pattern of antibiotic resistance may soon leave us defenseless against a frighteningly wide range of dangerous bacterial infections.
"Neuroscience in the Courtroom": Brain scans and other types of neurological evidence could transform judicial views of personal credibility and responsibility.
"Seconds before the Big One": Scientists have figured out a way to provide advanced warning before an earthquake strikes.
©2011 Scientific American
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Peter on 05-04-11

Great content but they need a new narrator

I think most would agree that SA has great content but they need a new narrator for their magazines. Someone that knows the sciences better and one that doesn't read like there are runon sentences. You can tell by his narration that he doesn't really understand the topics... unless he's just a really bad narrator. I love the magazine though and will continue to buy it either digitally or in print.

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By John Nuttall on 04-16-11

Content great, Narrator horrible

After a several year hiatus from Audible Scientific American, I was dissapointed to find, upon re-subscribing, that the new narrator, Mark Moran, makes the magazine almost unlistenable.

I think Mark could recover his career by listening to Ken Borgers or Todd Mundt (HBR). Even if he just read the way he converses. I mean, I can't imagine he talks this way to his co-workers or family... it would drive them crazy. Half the time when Mark reaches the end of a sentence, he rolls up in tone, as if he is mid-sentence. It makes it sound as if the entire article is one big run-on sentence. To top it off, he removes any pause between articles. So the entire issue sounds like one big run-on sentence. I can't imagine how this guy got the job. Someone's asleep at the helm.

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