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Publisher's Summary

One hundred years ago, scientists would have said that lasers, televisions, and the atomic bomb were beyond the realm of physical possibility. In Physics of the Impossible, the renowned physicist Michio Kaku explores to what extent the technologies and devices of science fiction (such as phasers, force fields, teleportation, and time travel) that are deemed equally impossible today might well become commonplace in the future.From teleportation to telekinesis, Kaku uses the world of science fiction to explore the fundamentals - and the limits - of the laws of physics as we know them today. In a compelling and thought-provoking narrative, he explains:
How the science of optics and electromagnetism may one day enable us to bend light around an object, like a stream flowing around a boulder, making the object invisible to observers downstream

How ramjet rockets, laser sails, antimatter engines, and nanorockets may one day take us to the nearby stars

How telepathy and psychokinesis, once considered pseudoscience, may one day be possible using advances in MRI, computers, superconductivity, and nanotechnology

Why a time machine is apparently consistent with the known laws of quantum physics, although it would take an unbelievably advanced civilization to actually build oneKaku uses his discussion of each technology as a jumping-off point to explain the science behind it. An extraordinary scientific adventure, Physics of the Impossible takes listeners on an unforgettable, mesmerizing journey into the world of science that both enlightens and entertains.
©2008 Michio Kaku; (P)2008 Random House, Inc.
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Critic Reviews

"Science and science fiction buffs can easily follow Kaku's explanations as he shows that in the wonderful worlds of science, impossible things are happening every day." (Publishers Weekly)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Kurt on 07-22-09

Inspired

Dr. Kaku isn't only a brilliant string theorist and well rounded communicator with a full breadth of knowledge, he is also inspirational and curious.
This book covers various sci-fantasies, such as force fields and time travel, and categorizes them into 3 different levels of 'impossibility' for our future.
He discusses force fields, invisibility, faster that light travel, E.T., and ultimately whether we will be able to escape the final end of this universe by bridging this universe to another and slipping away into a new, younger univese as this one succumbs to entropy or is torn apart as a result of the expansion of space itself.

He also touches on string theory, various current socioeconomic problems. He's well read, and without a doubt, he's the kind of guy you could easily sit and listen to for hours on end and not get bored.
Excellent book, fun, and certainly not difficult to understand.

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13 of 13 people found this review helpful


By Samantha on 01-26-14

Huge fan of Michio Kaku!!

What made the experience of listening to Physics of the Impossible the most enjoyable?

I love all of the ideas behind the chapters. Deciphering science fiction from fact is something many people cannot do alone, as they do not have physics backgrounds. Professor Kaku gives the listener valuable insight into the world of science and science fiction.

What other book might you compare Physics of the Impossible to and why?

His other books are equally amazing.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Everything - this is a must-have for those researching for science fiction writing and for those interested in science.

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24 of 25 people found this review helpful

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