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Publisher's Summary

Xenocide is the third installment of the Ender series. On Lusitania, Ender found a world where humans and pequeninos and the Hive Queen could all live together; where three very different intelligent species could find common ground at last. Or so he thought. But Lusitania also harbors the descolada, a virus which kills all humans it infects, but which the pequeninos require in order to transform into adults. The Starways Congress so fears the effect of the descolada, should it escape from Lusitania, that they have ordered the destruction of the entire planet and all who live there. The Fleet is on its way and a second Xenocide seems inevitable, until the Fleet vanishes.
Browse more titles in the Ender Wiggin series.
©1991 Orson Scott Card (P)2000 Audio Renaissance
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Critic Reviews

"Thought-provoking, insightful, and powerfully written." (School Library Journal)
"As a storyteller, Card excels in portraying the quiet drama of wars fought not on battlefields but in the hearts and minds of his characters." (Library Journal)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By David on 06-13-04

full of passion

Xenocide is perhaps the most overtly philosophical of the Ender Wiggin series so far. But the philosophy in the book serves a purpose to move the story forward and develop characters more.

In addition to making you think, it also makes you feel. Xenocide is told with the same passion as Ender's Game and Speaker for the Dead, and it is filled with just as much emotion and understanding. Yet it is also very much its own new and wonderful story, and not at all just a revisit to the same old themes of the first two books.

Note, however, that, as the author himself mentions in a short commentary at the end, this book is actually the first of a two part series (the next book is "Children of the Mind"). The ending of this book ties up some threads of the story, but not all of them. If you think of it as a stand-alone book, you may be disappointed. But if you think of it as the first in a two-part novel, then you'll likely be dying to get your hands on the next part of the story when you finish.

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70 of 75 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars
By Shaner on 08-08-04

Not great

After enjoying Ender's Game and Speaker for the Dead, I thought this story was overrated and didn't measure up to its predecessors.

In his afterword, Card mentions that his two concerns about the book are that it is heavily philosphical ("talky") and that it cuts out in the middle of the story arc, but neither of these were really an issue to me. I've read plenty of series that ended leaving the reader hanging and dependent on a following book, and I've read books that were very philosophically idea-heavy. The problem with Xenocide is not that it's too full of ideas that it spends a lot of time considering, it's that it's actually pretty thin on ideas, but it recycles those few in variations and belabors them to an exasperating degree. It is mostly populated by characters who are emotionally static and spend far too much time repeating themselves at each other, and it doesn't take long before that starts becoming tedious. Coming on the heels of Speaker for the Dead (a superior and deeply moving story in which nearly every character realizes significant emotional changes) as this book does, it feels dull and lifeless and long.

On top of that, I thought that one of the major plot developments toward the end of the book that leads into the next one was nothing short of silly and contrived. I don't want to spoil any secrets for people who haven't read it yet, but I think those that have read it will probably know which one I'm talking about.

I am currently torn between what is at this point an admittedly not-huge curiosity of what happens to resolve the story and a real reluctance to take the chance of having to sit through what may turn out to be a similarly tiresome exercise to get there, particularly because I know that it's going to heavily revolve around the aforementioned plot device from this book.

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29 of 32 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Nick Long on 10-19-16

Good but not exceptionable.

After listening to so speaker for the dead I had to get this one. It was OK, nothing got to too excited and parts could have been fleshed out more especially after a fire takes place.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Sophie C Butcher on 04-10-16

Fasinating

I can see how this could be made into a film but it would lose its philosophical soul. Lots of really interesting things to think about now. When is sanity madness and vice versa? When is it ok to wipe out a species? Who are you, actually? Enjoy.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Procrastinacious M.D. on 09-03-17

Philosophy at its best

great hybrid between theological ideas science fiction. beautiful story and well read by the actors.

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5 out of 5 stars
By Amanda on 06-07-17

Sci-Fi or Sci-Phi?

science, ethics, philosophy. Explorations of the meaning of life and a beings right to exist.

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