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Publisher's Summary

This critically acclaimed debut by breakout author Keith Donohue flawlessly blends fantasy and realism into an utterly unique fable, inspired by a W.B. Yeats poem, that has been described as a bedtime story for adults.Seven-year-old Henry Day is kidnapped and renamed "Aniday" by changelings, ageless beings who inhabit the woods near his home. The changelings also leave behind one of their own, who flawlessly impersonates Henry except for one noteworthy detail: the new Henry is a prodigiously talented pianist. Both Aniday and Henry settle comfortably enough into their new existences, but both are haunted by vague memories of their former lives.
A fresh take on the search for identity that will appeal to fans of J.R.R. Tolkien and J.M. Barrie, The Stolen Child triumphantly announces Donohue as a fresh voice in contemporary fiction.
©2006 Keith Donohue; (P)2006 Recorded Books, LLC
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Critic Reviews



Winner of Audio Publishers Association 2007 Audie Award, Science Fiction
"An impressive novel of outsiders whose feelings of alienation are more natural than supernatural." (Publishers Weekly)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Jon on 06-20-06

Not Anything Close to the Hype

Boo! This book was bad. I listened to it in a straight shot during a 14-hour drive across 4 states. My biggest problem was the main story-telling device of the book -- one story would plod along in one person's perspective and then, we'd have to hear essentially the same story told again from a different person's perspective. This would be interesting if there were more going on and there were perspectives being told by more than two people. But it felt so redundant and in turn I just didn't care at all for these characters. The writer clearly understands description, but really fell apart in his interactions between people. These people felt more like caricatures more than characters. As a result, the book REALLY didn't work for me. There's a better book out there that uses a very similar story-telling device, but is much more successful in its iteration. It's called "The History of Love", by Nicole Krauss. I'd urge you to read that book instead. Sorry, Mr. Donohue. Two stars from me.

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12 of 13 people found this review helpful


By Zusamna on 06-10-06

Unique

A very unique story, I'm glad that I chose it. I found it to be captivating and easy to visualize while I was sewing. I only gave it 4 stars because I usually like to purchase 30-40 hour long unabridged tales. Sorry this one stopped, I could have listened to it all week.

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5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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