The Name of the Wind : KingKiller Chronicles

  • by Patrick Rothfuss
  • Narrated by Nick Podehl
  • Series: KingKiller Chronicles
  • 27 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

"My name is Kvothe. I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I have burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during the day. I have talked to God's, loved women and written songs that make the minstrels weep. You may have heard of me."So begins a tale unequaled in fantasy literature - the story of a hero told in his own voice. It is a tale of sorrow, a tale of survival, a tale of one man's search for meaning in his universe, and how that search, and the indomitable will that drove it, gave birth to a legend.

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Audible Editor Reviews

Why we think it's Essential - When you finish listening to The Name of Wind for the first time, you'll wonder where the hours went. When you listen again (and if you listen to it once, you will want to listen a second time) you'll marvel at the depth and intricacy of the fantasy world that Rothfuss has created. Details that initially seemed irrelevant will show themselves to be keystones of a greater story you didn't even notice the first time around. By the time your finger hovers over the Play button for a third time you'll realize that, to quote George R.R. Martin, "he's bloody good, this Rothfuss guy." —Michael

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What the Critics Say

“The originality of Rothfuss's outstanding debut fantasy, the first of a trilogy, lies less in its unnamed imaginary world than in its precise execution…As absorbing on a second reading as it is on the first, this is the type of assured, rich first novel most writers can only dream of producing. The fantasy world has a new star.” (Publishers Weekly, Starred Review)
“Fantasy readers-a notoriously discerning group-tend to dole out praise judiciously, which makes the reception of The Name of the Wind, the first volume in Patrick Rothfuss's The Kingkiller Chronicle, that much more remarkable. Critics are already throwing around comparisons to some of the biggest names in fantasy, including George R. R. Martin, Tad Williams, the recently deceased Robert Jordan, and even Tolkien. (Bookmarks Magazine)
“New fantasy authors are usually overhyped, and it's rare to find one who writes with such assurance and narrative skill right from the start. I was reminded of Ursula LeGuin, George R. R. Martin, and J. R. R. Tolkien, but never felt that Rothfuss was imitating anyone. Like the writers he clearly admires, he's an old-fashioned storyteller working with traditional elements, but his voice is his own. I haven't been so gripped by a new fantasy series in years. It's certain to become a classic." (Lisa Tuttle, The Times)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Great Debut or Average experienced writer

If you look at this as a debut writer who is going to grow in his talent and if this is his first novel then it is great. If this is an experienced writer or someone who just changed his pen name then it is average to good. If you read some early Koontz and Gerrtisen then you will find they did not start the great writers that they are today.

What is Great? PR can paint a picture in your mind better then most writers I have read. I am literal minded and often have problems with flowery language and picturing in my head what the writer is explaining, but with this book, I always had a very vivid picture of the characters and the scenery. PR himself got into my head. Over half way into the book, when things were going well for the main character, I remember thinking, nothing ever goes this well for Kyothe for this long without something going wrong, so when is the other shoe going to drop? That was the exact words that ran through my head. Not a minute later, Kyothe thinks to himself, things are going to well, when will the other shoe drop? Some of his writings stirred my emotions, made me tense, made me hear the music, made me want to shake Kyothe and tell him to snap out of it, like Kyothe was a real friend of mine, who I wanted to help.

Good: At times there is great insight. For example, at one point he explains that if you can make a women feel beautiful, not just say it, but make her actually feel she is beautiful and then she sees in her own mind that she is beautiful, she will act beautiful and other people will see her as beautiful. I am a strong believer in this and I have seen it happen in the lives of some close to me and I have seen the opposite. The mind is a powerful thing. The book has dragons, magic, wizards, underground tunnels, buildings with hidden rooms,etc.

Average to bad: Often the story does not seem to be going anywhere. It is not clear what the goal is. There are no character goals, no quest, no reason to keep listening. One reviewer wrote that you get this happened then this happened then this happened, I agree. At almost 28 hours it took me a week to get through it. I found that each day I did not dread having to listen or get impatient, but I also found I had no great desire or want to hear the story. The story seems rather disjointed at times, one minute we are facing this problem and then it is totally forgot and we are off to some other problem. Many problems do not get handled. I did not care for the story in a story or even the story in a story in a story. The beginning, interludes and ending are distractions. Sometimes the writing is a little sophmoric. As the writer matures I believe these mistakes will be taken care of in future writings and I believe PR has the potential to be a great writer.

Some did not like the narrator, I thought he was great and added to the story
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- Jim "The Impatient"

Great story but the narration steels the show

This book tells the story of Cvothe and how, as he says in his own words he "trooped, traveled, loved, lost and was betrayed". Essentially this is your basic coming of age, rights of passage fantasy, where the young boy comes to terms with whatever strange powers he has while at the same time the story builds the cast of friends and enemies who will help and hinder him on his way. The story itself, while not wholely original is well written and engaging at all times. I found myself thinking about the book and its characters while not reading it, which is always a sign the book has captured my imagination. The writing style is clear and concise and the dialogue is excellent, which is more than you can say for most epic fantasies. It must be stressed that this is very much a character driven story. While we are given some details about the world the characters live in, this is really just to support the story, rather than to tell it. The book is not without its flaws. Firstly Cvothe is just that bit too brilliant. He is a masterful musician, he picks up new ideas almost instantaniously, he has a clever mouth and even cleverer hands. Secondly, the use of language is jarringly anachronistic at times. The language is very modern american in its use of expressions and slang and this does not always sit well against the obvious renaissance backdrop of the book. Lastly, the final third of the book seemed very flat. The sole purpose of the book seems to be to lay foundations for what is to come. Finally, I need to mention the narration. Nick Podehl does a fantastic job of narrating this book. His use of voices and accents throughout is just incredible. He uses just the right intonation and pitch of voice while at all times remaining clear and distinct.
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- Ttim

Book Details

  • Release Date: 05-15-2009
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio