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Publisher's Summary

Shevek, a brilliant physicist, decides to take action. He will seek answers, question the unquestionable, and attempt to tear down the walls of hatred that have isolated his planet of anarchists from the rest of the civilized universe. To do this dangerous task will mean giving up his family and possibly his life. Shevek must make the unprecedented journey to the utopian mother planet, Anarres, to challenge the complex structures of life and living, and ignite the fires of change.
©1974 Ursula K. Le Guin (P)2010 HarperCollins Publishers
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Critic Reviews



Hugo Award, Best Novel, 1975
Nebula Award, Best Novel, 1974

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Isaac on 10-09-10

One of my favorite novels of all time

Some readers and critics have suggested that Le Guin is "promoting" anarchism/communism; this is too simplistic, since the book is far too subtle and tentative to work as propaganda. Instead, she posits an attractive and idealistic society, contrasts it with a world with an appealing facade and an unattractive underclass, and shows how human nature tends to corrupt even the most well-meaning of civilizations. A book of ideas rather than of advocacy, "The Dispossessed" challenges readers to envision humankind's limitless possibilities.

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71 of 73 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars
By Scott S on 09-13-16

OK story but odd storytelling at times

The draw is the description of the framework of the anarchist society, but this is sometimes thoughtful and sometimes incomplete. Storytelling is a long chain of sometimes laborious conversation with occasional brilliant descriptive writing. Frequently jolts the reader out of immersion with a not chronological flow, jumping around for no obvious reason. There is almost a philosophical science interest but in the end it is never really fleshed out. Worth reading due to award status, but not a sci fi classic.

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6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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