River of Gods

  • by Ian McDonald
  • Narrated by Jonathan Keeble
  • 21 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

August 15th, 2047. Happy 100th Birthday, India....
On the eve of Mother India's 100th birthday, 10 people are doing 10 very different things. In the next few weeks, all these people will be swept together to decide the fate of the nation. From gangsters to government advisors, from superstitious street-boys to scientists to computer-generated soap stars, River of Gods shows a civilization in flux - a river of gods.
River of Gods is an epic science fiction novel, as sprawling, vibrant and colourful as the sub-continent it describes. This is a novel that blew apart the narrow Anglo- and US-centric concerns of the genre, and ushered in a new global consciousness for science fiction as a whole.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

A long and winding river

McDonald has become well known for setting his stories outside of the traditional Euro-American context of most science fiction, and the effect is to lend an air of the exotic and strange to the near future he imagines. This novel, set in a balkanized India at the middle of the century, follows that pattern. Be warned that it starts slowly with a subplot that is somewhat removed from the main action, and it takes a long time to really get to the meat of the science fiction that drives the story. Like all McDonald novels it is very well written, with language that is often surprising in the way that good poetry can be, but it also flows languidly, just like the Ganges River from which it takes its title, taking its time to gather together the life streams of its many complicated characters. This is only sporadically a book of intense action and high excitement, but it is thought provoking and well crafted, with a nice twist at the end to resolve the major mystery at its heart. In the process it wrestles with big themes about the nature of intelligence and the meaning of life, drawing extensively from the cultural history of India and Hinduism in the process. Indeed, one of the major negatives about listening to this book rather than reading it is that you don’t have access to the excellent and informative Glossary included at the end. The narration is generally excellent, although Jonathan Keeble isn’t consistently good at American accents. All in all this is definitely worth a listen.
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- Ken "Say something about yourself!"

Great philosophy, technology, story

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Definitely. It's rare to find a book about India, let alone a science fiction book. As an anthropology student of the subcontintent, I was pleased that McDonald just jumped into use of terms like bindi, crore, etc. without explanation (it wasn't until I hit the glossary at the end that I realized it even existed -- one of the few limitations of audio books).


What did you like best about this story?

The philosophy of self and the great portrayal of India.


Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I would have happily done so. I usually listen to books on my commute, but I found myself putting on my headphones at home whenever I could steal a few moments to listen.


Any additional comments?

I have a huge issue with readers (and directors!) who let pronunciation issues slip through. It seriously irked me that McDonald's phonetic shortening of "artificial intelligence" to aeai got pronounced as "ah-ay-ee". It's Ae-ai. Æ-I. A.I. Artificial Intelligence. Someone should have caught that and made a correction the first time it was uttered so strangely. It's like the director didn't even read the book.Keeble's performance was otherwise great -- doing distinct voices and accents for that many characters is more than admirable and I look forward to finding more books read by him.

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- Chris

Book Details

  • Release Date: 06-21-2012
  • Publisher: Audible Studios