Orphanage : Jason Wander

  • by Robert Buettner
  • Narrated by Adam Epstein
  • Series: Jason Wander
  • 8 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Mankind's first alien contact tears into Earth: Projectiles launched from Jupiter's moon, Ganymede, vaporize whole cities. Under siege, humanity gambles on one desperate counterstrike. In a spacecraft scavenged from scraps and armed with Vietnam-era weapons, foot soldiers like 18-year-old Jason Wander-orphans that no one will miss-must dare man's first interplanetary voyage and invade Ganymede.
They have one chance to attack, one ship to attack with. Their failure is our extinction.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

groan

This book is just not put together very well. From the writing style to story to character.

What I liked least was the fact that the main character and his friend are in highschool when the story starts. If I make it out right, 6 months later his friend is an internationally known space pilot who cavalierly takes control of Space Shuttles etc.

Mainly, this is a war story. VERY BADLY WRITTEN WAR STORY.

If you want a good book that is totally the opposite of this writing wise, try either Old Man's War or Armour by Steakley.
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- clifford

Good standard Military SF, Terrible Reader

The title of this review is really all I wanted to say. This is workmanlike military science ficton. Not exceptional, but well over the minimum "fair average quality which would pass without objection in the trade." Like all military SF, it's really an extended essay on the stuff that matters in life: duty, sacrifice, competition, friendship, the value of life, and the fear of death, all illustrated by stories featuring the things that entertain us all: violence, sex, and good triumphing over evil. Buettner has his own slant on all of the above. Good for him. What more could we ask?

Mostly we could ask for a reader who doesn't sound like an idiot with a sinus infection. It grates. I suspect Adam Epstein is trying too hard to channel the personality of the first-person narrator, who is a fairly emotional high-school drop-out. But that doesn't make him (or any real-life high-school drop-out) an idiot. The POV character certainly doesn't behave like like an idiot, and the other characters don't react to him as if he were one. The effect is dissonant, and becomes more so as the narrator gains in rank and experience.

Still worth listening to. Hence the three stars, but the paper book would be a better choice.
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- Augustus T. White

Book Details

  • Release Date: 12-13-2012
  • Publisher: Audible Studios