Metro 2033 : Metro

  • by Dmitry Glukhovsky
  • Narrated by Rupert Degas
  • Series: Metro
  • 20 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

The year is 2033. The world has been reduced to rubble. Humanity is nearly extinct and the half-destroyed cities have become uninhabitable through radiation. Beyond their boundaries, they say, lie endless burned-out deserts and the remains of splintered forests. Survivors still remember the past greatness of humankind, but the last remains of civilisation have already become a distant memory.
Man has handed over stewardship of the Earth to new life-forms. Mutated by radiation, they are better adapted to the new world. A few score thousand survivors live on, not knowing whether they are the only ones left on Earth, living in the Moscow Metro - the biggest air-raid shelter ever built. Stations have become mini-statelets, their people uniting around ideas, religions, water-filters, or the need to repulse enemy incursion.
VDNKh is the northernmost inhabited station on its line, one of the Metro's best stations and secure. But a new and terrible threat has appeared. Artyom, a young man living in VDNKh, is given the task of penetrating to the heart of the Metro to alert everyone to the danger and to get help. He holds the future of his station in his hands, the whole Metro - and maybe the whole of humanity.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Fantastic voicework and great story

What did you love best about Metro 2033?

How immersive the story was, how absorbed in the world I'd become whenever I would resume listening. Haven't felt that way with a good book in a long time, I credit the author and the voice actor for their ability to convey the heart of such interesting characters.


Who was your favorite character and why?

Khan, because, He's Khan.


Which scene was your favorite?

The scene where the young boy who is with the old man attacks the Reich soldier and is killed, artyom through anger sacrifices himself on principle, in the presence of death.


Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes, fortunately it's very long so I couldn't. I love consistently great books that take forever to finish its so worthy of your time


Any additional comments?

Rupert Degas is my favorite voice actor to ever do an audiobook. I've listened to like 30-40 audiobooks in my life and never have I been so drawn in and convinced by a full on performance of dialogue. Let me just say this, if this man doesn't do the 2035 audiobook when that comes out I will be ridiculously upset. Also, if you get a chance, try out the games they somehow manage to be phenomenal as well. This author has got something special with this world and I'd hate to see him let it go just yet, it's dying for more stories, begging for them, like a call, coming down the tunnel.

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- Jameson

Mutants on the metro!

A nuclear war in 2013 wiped out most of the population of the world, and the remnants living underground in the Moscow subway tunnels believe they are the only humans left alive. Each station in the old metro is now its own little city-state. The main character, a young man named Artyom, is sent on a quest to another station. Along the way, he meets Nazis, Communists, Satanists, monks, cannibals, cultists, flying monsters, and mutants. The ending is ironic and grim, as befits a Russian novel taking place after the bombs fall.

Apparently a big cult phenomenon in Russia, which has spawned sequels and video games, Metro 2033 reads a lot like an old-school post-holocaust fantasy, with a man of the new world journeying through the wreckage of the old one, missing the references that are left for the reader to recognize. It also reads a lot like an old-school dungeon crawl, which makes it both repetitive and fun, though I'm afraid the repetitiveness caused me to tune out at several points in the story as I listened to the audiobook.

Artyom's quest basically consists of going from one station to the next, finding each ruled by some twisted microcosm of the old world (the Red Line, the Fourth Reich, the Watchtower, etc.), escaping, and moving on, acquiring and losing companions along the way.

It's not hard to see how this would adapt well to a game. The writing was often psychologically deeper than your typical mutant-haunted post-apocalyptic tale, but the descriptiveness of the prose seemed to fall a little flat in translation. It's definitely a little different in tone from a Western sci-fi novel, even though it conforms to the genre fine. Had it been a little bit less of a dungeon crawl, I would probably have enjoyed it more, but after the third or fourth narrow escape from underground morlocks, I began to simply become impatient for the climax. I suspect, however, that there are a lot of references and in-jokes that didn't translate well into English.

I was not a big fan of the narrator, who was not terrible, and had a properly deep, sonorous Russian voice, but his tone was flat and he frequently dropped his voice so low that I could not hear his words while driving unless I turned the volume all the way up.
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- David "Indiscriminate Reader"

Book Details

  • Release Date: 11-19-2013
  • Publisher: Audible Studios