Exo : Jumper

  • by Steven Gould
  • Narrated by Emily Rankin
  • Series: Jumper
  • 15 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Award-winning author Steven Gould returns to the world of his classic novel Jumper in Exo, the sequel to Impulse, blending the drama of high school with world shattering consequences.
Cent can teleport. So can her parents, but they are the only people in the world who can. This is not as great as you might think it would be - sure, you can go shopping in Japan and then have tea in London, but it's hard to keep a secret like that. And there are people, dangerous people, who work for governments and have guns, who want to make you do just this one thing for them. And when you're a teenage girl things get even more complicated. High school. Boys. Global climate change, refugees, and genocide. Orbital mechanics.
But Cent isn't easily daunted, and neither are Davy and Millie, her parents. She's going to make some changes in the world.


What the Critics Say

"Heady, zippy, fabulous reading....an intensely human story about love, honor, loyalty, betrayal and family." (BoingBoing)


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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Great young adult read.

What made the experience of listening to Exo the most enjoyable?

Okay, I wasn't that fond of Steven's last Jumper novel for the reasons I've already stated, but EXO is another thing entirely. This novel is great for the 12-18 crowd and reminds me a lot of the young adult SF novels of my own youth. The most recent novel that I felt was this good (and of the same ilk) was The Martian, but it was an adult book and not a young adult book. While the previous novel of Cent and her family had far too much teenage angst for me to enjoy and the subject matter didn't appeal, this novel has less angst and more Low Earth Orbit. Steven has obviously researched the International Space Station and the problems associated with micro-gravity and he handles it well. The narration by Ms Rankin was once again dead on for the voice of Cent.

Which character – as performed by Emily Rankin – was your favorite?

Obviously Cent was the best character, although several others were nearly as enjoyable.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I normally only listen to audio books while driving, but that's only about an hour per day. I finished this book in three days by spending a good share of my home time listening to it also.

Any additional comments?

Give it to your adolescent and pre-adolescent friends, they'll love you for it.

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- Richard A. Bamberg


What would have made Exo better?

Give it plot and drama and believable dialog.

What was most disappointing about Steven Gould’s story?

No plot.Written for 10 to 12 year olds.

What character would you cut from Exo?

Jade and her friend. They don't seem to add anything to the story. But, I forgot, there is no story.

Any additional comments?

If you want to listen to 12 1/2 hours of science data from a supposed 17 year old before any drama materializes, then this could be your cup of tea. Really, in a 16 hour book there is no plot whatsoever until some drama unfolds at about 12 1/2 hours. The dialog is so unreal. It's as if everyone is a computer spitting back data from a database. These are not the kind of thoughts or words real people say to one another. I really liked Jumper and Griffin's Story, but this book is just trite. Now if I was 12, I think I would really like this book because it has all this cool space stuff and teleporting. Wow! But I'm not. Then again, if I was 12 I would not understand any of the science talk and there is a ton of that here.If it is the author's intention to introduce science to young readers, then this is a huge fail. Any teen would be forever put off science by this book because obviously -- from the story -- it requires a genius intellect to understand all this talk about space and medicine. Amazingly everyone seems to know so much nomenclature about medical procedures and pathologies, and space and military and guns and etc. Our 17 yr old Cent can calculate trajectories and positions in space from a headful of numbers. Really! How dry and uninteresting. I would think Jumpers had more of a feel -- an intuition -- associated with their skill. But Cent is like a computer: You punch in the numbers and she can jump. I FEEL Gould took the essence from his series and jettisoned it from his writing.

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- JohnSays "JohnSays"

Book Details

  • Release Date: 09-09-2014
  • Publisher: Audible Studios