Dragonhaven

  • by Robin McKinley
  • Narrated by Noah Galvin
  • 13 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Dragons are extinct in the wild, but the Makepeace Institute of Integrated Dragon Studies in Smokehill National Park is home to about two hundred of the world's remaining creatures. Until Jake discovers a dying dragon that has given birth - and one of the babies is still alive.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

A tremendous fantasy!!

Would you consider the audio edition of Dragonhaven to be better than the print version?

I loved both...I think the audio edition has a slight edge because Robin McKinley's channeling of a teenage boy when writing this has been fleshed out by a narrator that seemingly is channeling the very same (slightly crazed) teenager!


What did you like best about this story?

I love the little differences from our world and Robin's Dragonhaven world that are just sort of slipped in with no fanfare and cause you to suddenly, go, "um, wait...what just changed from MY world's 'normal' there??!).


What about Noah Galvin’s performance did you like?

I felt as though my best friend's 20-something slightly ADHD son was telling me the story (he, by the way, is very interesting to listen to, as is this story), When I started listening to this, I immediately flashed back and thought, this is just the way I heard it in my head when I was reading the paper version!

I would guess that some people would prefer a more mainstream narration, but I thoroughly enjoyed story and narration as a seamless mixture, without trying to "read" the story to me as if I were a 2-year-old, which is how some narrators approach the task.


Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Both.


Any additional comments?

This is one of my favorite book to re-read when on a trip. I always seem to catch some little something I missed on the other reads that makes the story even better.

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- Jeanne

A master author at the top of her powers.

Robin McKinley's protagonists are usually young women. In this book the main character is a teenage boy. That boy is telling his story in the first person, and it is a story which he finds hard to tell. So in the beginning the story seems rough, clumsily written. This is not a sign that Robin McKinley is a poor writer. It's an indicator that she is a masterful writer, and she is telling the story not in her own voice, but in the voice of that inexperienced young man.

And it is a wonderful story.

In much science fiction and fantasy, the aliens or talking creatures simply seem like humans in funny looking costumes. But the dragons in this story truly seem alien in their being. Their thoughts and attitudes are not human. Their point of view is not human. And they don't find it any easier to understand humans than humans can understand them.

If you have read her most popular books (The Hero and the Crown, The Blue Sword, Beauty, etc.), please don't go into this one expecting more of the same or you may be disappointed. This book is fairly different from most of her books. It needs to be taken on its own. But if you can leave all your preconceptions at the door, I think you will find this a story well worth reading.

A word about the narrator. I think his voice fits the main character admirably. He did a good job.
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- ShySusan

Book Details

  • Release Date: 06-18-2013
  • Publisher: Recorded Books