Destroyer : Rewinder

  • by Brett Battles
  • Narrated by Vikas Adam
  • Series: Rewinder
  • 7 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

With the whole of human history altered, Denny Younger may be the last rewinder in existence - and the last person on Earth with a chaser unit capable of time travel. While caring for his ailing sister, Denny must discover a way to recharge his device before he's left with no defense against a past that wants him dead. Before long, Denny notices a mysterious stranger following him - keeping tabs on Denny, his family, and his friends. Is Denny just paranoid? Or maybe he isn't alone in this new reality after all....
When his chaser is stolen and his girlfriend is kidnapped, Denny risks everything to get both of them back. Launched into a high-stakes chase that spans continents and millennia, Denny's responsibility to save our future isn't over yet. It will take all of his cunning to stop a threat capable of steering the fate of the human race into disaster.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Too many words, not enough story, abrupt ending

I really dislike it when a book races, races, races and then abruptly stops, as if the author had to stop for a bathroom break and then never came back to finish it. I wish I had not bought the audible. You have to stay with the kindle as there are huge blocks of repetition that one has to skim over again and again. And again!

I loved the first one! Vikas Adam was wonderful, as usual.
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- gardener97

Fantastic narration! Terrible story.

What disappointed you about Destroyer?

Almost everything. Let me caveat what I am about to say with this; I LOVED the first book. I thought it was fantastic. I thought the story was strong. I was really looking forward to reading the second book because this universe fascinated me and I wanted to see how else the author could write historical fiction.

Unfortunately, this was a book that did not add to the story, did not advance the story and took a strong protagonist and turned him into a bumbling, indecisive, morality-juggling tool to earn the author an additional paycheck. I am going to go into some SPOILERS now, so if you are planning on listening to this book, please move on to the next section:
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1.) In the first novel the paradoxes were easily explained away due to the fact that an entire timeline was wiped out. In this book, especially at the end, the paradox of Denny kidnapping an earlier version of himself should have already occurred. In the first book it never happened which makes me wonder a.) how did he complete his original mission if one of him was missing, b.) why did he have no knowledge of it since it happened to scout him after his home timeline ended and c.) why make it more confusing than it had to be?

2.) The plot devices needed to keep this story going are absurd. Early in the book he has an opportunity to stop everything from happening when Lydia's grandson has Iffy tied up. Instead of just doing it, he postulates that he couldn't live knowing that he caused one version of Iffy to die...Even though he had done that once in the original book and had to have known that it would occur again. So instead of letting Iffy "die" he lets an entire world "die" by going along with Lydia's plan.

3.) How will Denny be able to undo what Lydia did in Germany when he has no clue what happened? He was too busy feeling badly about stealing a pair of jeans rather than finding Lydia. The amount of moral babbling he did in this book was enough to make me fast forward through parts. The dialogues weren't as long as those written by Ayn Rand, but they were close. Ultimately, they added nothing to the story and for all of the moral dithering Denny did, he had no issues killing Lydia at the end of the book.

4.) Did Denny forget how to fight? Even if he didn't know how to fight, his opponent (Lydia) is physically smaller than him and (I'm assuming) doesn't weigh as much. All he had to do was punch her in the face a few times and he wins. With that, at the end of the book the knife he was looking for magically stayed in his hand and he didn't notice until it was convenient for him to use said knife to kill the antagonist. Deus Ex Machina, anyone?

5.) Why did Denny get stupider as the story went on? As soon as the "old lady" was mentioned I knew it was Lydia. How did he not know? Keep in mind, a.) it had only been 3 months for him since he last saw her, b.) somebody else knew about his time travelling skills and the only person he knew that was left alive from his home time was Lydia, c.) part of the reason he got rid of his original chaser was because it was almost out of power! Add on to the some of the other decisions he made, such as being outwitted at every turn by Lydia (the open backdoor of the house in 1952, the cement cage, the stadium, the running, the burnt out house in England), him giving up information about everything anytime Iffy was threatened and him telling Lydia about the power charger. There were probably 10 instances in this entire book where he could have made a simple choice and ended any threat that faced him.

6.) Both he and Lydia received the "movie star" treatment when they fought. He smashed his elbow in Lydias chin and she literally shook it off. I don't know if the author has ever taken an elbow to the chin but you don't just get up and say, "good show, old chap" and keep on running. Numerous kicks, punches, elbows, stab wounds, should have taken either one of them out of the fight for good. On top of that, at the very end of the book both he and Lydia jump ~200 years and they are still able to duke it out prior to passing out. In the original book (as mentioned by Denny in this book), he took a similar jump and was passed out for a week. But hey, they plot needs some action so "erase erase erase"...he's good!

7.) Iffy is changed from a smart, resourceful supporting character to a meek, quiet, useless sidekick that is just there to ensure Denny has a reason to make bad decisions. Take, for example, how Kane kidnapped her in the restaurant. She went to the bathroom and he flashes a gun, under his coat to her. She said she was afraid to say anything because he would shoot her. So, let me get this straight, she is in a public place, there are other people around, he is hiding a gun that nobody else sees...Instead of screaming, running, punching, kicking, doing anything to raise suspicions about this weird guy with his hand in his coat, she just goes along with him? WHAT?!?!?! WHY?! HE ISN'T GOING TO SHOOT YOU IN PUBLIC!!!! This is repeated a few times, like when Denny tells Iffy to stay down the hill when he is scoping out the house for the first time in 1952. What does she do? Just the opposite! Why does he take her in the house with him when he is trying to steal the chaser? Also, why even give RJ any personality at all? He was nothing but a plot device.
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I will read the next book in this series even though this book has a ridiculous amount of flaws. I hope the author takes what fans think seriously and gets back to his roots for the next installment because if it is anything like this one, it will be a huge eye roller.

As others have suggested, I would wait until the next book is released and listen/read all three at the same time so you don't have to sit through this book twice.


What do you think your next listen will be?

Going to finish the History of Greece


What about Vikas Adam’s performance did you like?

Vikas Adam's was amazing! Characters were easily distinguishable, pacing was great, voice acting was fantastic. His narration was the only thing that make this book tolerable. Please, please, please lock him up for the next book.


What character would you cut from Destroyer?

RJ and this Iffy. Bring back the Iffy from the previous book.


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- Woodrow M Bell

Book Details

  • Release Date: 01-12-2016
  • Publisher: Audible Studios