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Publisher's Summary

In a near-future world, seraphs and demons fight a never-ending battle. But a new species of mage has arisen. Thorn St. Croix is no ordinary neo-mage. Nearly driven insane by her powers, she has escaped the confines of the Enclaves and now lives among humans. When her ex-husband is kidnapped, Thorn must risk revealing her true identity to save him.
©2008 Faith Hunter (P)2010 Audible, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By pewter on 07-28-11

Bloodring Redux

Earlier this year I wrote a review of Bloodring (Rogue Mage, Book 1) and I was highly critical of the narrator, particularly the pronunciation errors. I pointed out a single annoying example that was repeated throughout the book. Imagine my surprise when I got an email from Audible telling me that they took note of my review and corrected the mispronunciations. As requested, I downloaded the corrected book and listened. True to promise, Audible had corrected the annoying mispronunciation of solder. I found I could overlook the remaining mild errors like Seltic (Celtic) knot.

I thought the narrator was appropriate for the characters, especially the main character, a fairly tough young woman who had overcome hardships. Gold's voice is gritty and jaded just enough to tell this kind of story. Her characters, both male and female, are distinguishable and her style of reading contributes to the overall setting. In all fairness, the story was original and I liked the characters well enough to find out how the story ended. I did go on to finish the Rogue Mage series, rating all the books as 4 of 5. I do recommend this series to anyone who enjoys this genre.

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48 of 48 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Pauline on 08-17-10

A Refreshing Direction

This series by Faith Hunter was thoroughly delightful to me. Not to give too much away but most authors writing about Angels have such a sugar-coated view. Faith has managed to build interesting characters and personalities in these stories whether those personalities are human, or non-human, even within each group. This is a series of books to be read where you don't have to put the book down until you nod off from sleep deprivation and ardent reading...get this book and the two that follow!

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24 of 24 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
2 out of 5 stars
By Ozzymandias on 09-26-13

A simpering and ineffectual heroine

Faith Hunter has written the Jane Yellowrock series, which is a fantastic and exciting set of stories with a strong female lead and I find it hard to reconcile the fact that the Rogue Mage series was written by the same author.

Quite frankly I found the rogue mage to be simpering and mewling, I'd find it very tough to be around someone who was so constantly depressed. If it's not moaning about the latest injury she's had in a fight it's about how "her man done her wrong" or being alienated from her own people or her "inappropriate" attraction to certain beings and while its okay to allow some complaining it gets old and you feel like shouting, "lady, just get it together already". If you knew Yellowrock you know you'd betray her at your own peril, she's come back for your proverbials, whereas the mage just gets constantly trodden on in the most annoying way.

Ineffectual. Despite being a mage that can call upon the power of angles for goodness sake, you always get the feeling that she's constantly on the verge of screwing something up, making a bad decision or getting herself killed. For me this doesn't add tension, it just gets more and more annoying.

Imagine putting a team of warriors together to storm an evil supernat strong-hold. Jane Yellowrock would be leading and a team member comes up to her and says "does 'she' have to come with us?", Yellowrock would be like "Nah, she'll only screw something up. Tell to stay home and do NOTHING, the last thing we want is getting back and finding that the food's gone bad 'cause she's been communing with bad spirits." The team laughs and mage shuffles off crying to her room, falls asleep and is woken up by the raucous celebration of Yellowrock's butt-kicking victory.

On this post-apocalyptic earth, I didn't feel as if there was enough scenic description and character development. Some parts of it read like the a bad acid trip colliding with revelations in the bible, but since I've never taken acid I may just say odd and confusing but not in an entertaining way.

I have listened to all three books in this series and they read pretty much the same. If you want to read an entertaining Faith Hunter series pick up Yellowrock, it's well worth it.

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4 of 5 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars
By DebB on 04-13-13

Absorbing and a good listen

I have to say, I struggled to precis this book, now finished a couple of weeks ago! That said, it caught my interest immediately, and I looked forward to my next installment (I listen at the gym) to the extent that I was annoyed when I had to miss my usual alternate day gym session, as it meant I'd have to wait to find out what happened next.

So... what's it about? The story is set on Earth, in modern day, but a somewhat different modern day to now. Most of the Earth's population were wiped out a hundred years or so before the book begins, in the apocalypse. Earth is now in a mini ice age, there are Seraphs (angel like. maybe heavenly beings, complete with wings), demons (subterranean nasties that have a taste for human flesh), humans, and a few mixes between the supernaturals and each other, or supernaturals and humans. Our heroine, Thorn St Croix, is a neomage, a race despised and feared by most of humanity for deeds done during the apocalypse, and lusted after (if I remember rightly) by the Seraphs (for sex), and by demons (for their super-tasty blood). Humanity, which seems to have reverted to religious orthodoxy and rigidity, hates and fears neomages with an intensity that mirrors the inquisition.

Thorn escaped from the Enclave 10 years earlier, when her powers developed in a way that was driving her insane. The Enclave is a place where others of her kind have to live - being out and about without registration is absolutely forbidden. As Thorn is unregistered, and thereby very, very illegal, she lives disguised as a human and channels her gifts as a stone mage into making jewellery.

When her ex is kidnapped and the authorities get suspicious Thorn tries to find out why he was taken, by who, and to where, all without exposing herself. On the way, she finds support, friends, and attracts far more attention than is good for her.

This is well read, with the various characters well narrated and differentiated.

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2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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