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Publisher's Summary

Marine archaeologist Jack Howard has stumbled upon the keys to an ancient puzzle. With a crack team of scientific experts and ex-Special Forces commandos, he is heading for what he believes could be the greatest archaeological find of all time - the site of fabled Atlantis - while a ruthless adversary watches his every move and prepares to strike. But neither Jack nor his adversary could have imagined what awaits them in the murky depths - not only a shocking truth about a lost world but an explosive secret that could have devastating consequences today. Jack is determined to stop the legacy of Atlantis from falling into the wrong hands, whatever the cost. But first he must do battle to prevent a global catastrophe.
©2006 David Gibbins (P)2014 Tantor
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Critic Reviews

"The historical conspiracy angle gives the book Da Vinci-esque appeal, and the intense visual details of the team's marine discoveries make it naturally cinematic." ---Publishers Weekly
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By GH on 06-01-15

Solid plausible fiction -- a touch too technical

Atlantis is centered around finding the lost city of Atlantis. There are three big detractions from theplot. First, the first twenty-five percent of the is filled with techo-details -- too many. Instead of enhancing the story, these details distance the listener from the story. If Gibbins wanted realism then he went too far with these details. Second, there at least two major coincidences that weaken the overall plot. One of the coincidences, although playing a major plot role, could have been cut from the novel. Last, the sub-characters, especially Katya, were flat and needed rounding.

The explanation of the posed for the possibilities of the Altlantian civilization are the strong part of this novel. Gibbins put in place a fictional framework that could have happened. The story felt real during its telling. James Langton did and nice job narrating.

If you like historical-thriller fiction, it is worth the read. This is book one of a series. The first novel had enough redeeming value to give the second in the series a try.

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4 of 4 people found this review helpful


By Sean O'Skea on 09-15-15

So much hope, so much disappointment

I was excited and eager to listen to Atlantis by David Gibbins hoping to find a new series.

The first few chapters were promising with some plausible theories about the Atlantis story. Then our team of archeologists/navy seals meets the ridiculously well-funded baddie who would make a Bond villain blush. With no build up or suspense, suddenly our heroes have discovered and explored Atlantis. Whenever they are faced with a technical problem they just happen to have a prototype of some science fiction tool onboard that handles it. Deus ex Machina indeed.

From there the book devolves into a narrative form of the Jane’s military almanac. Every weapon, vessel, and tool is tediously described while the dialogue and plot come to a near halt.

Why can’t we just have an adventure novel? Why does every villain have to be a billionaire terrorist at the head of secret global syndicate of infinite resources? Why does every hero have to be a cross between Capitan Kirk and Rambo?

If you are a fan of over-the-top “action” novels like those pumped out by Clive Cussler, then you’ll probably enjoy Atlantis, its cardboard characters, forgettable plot, and ludicrous paramilitary technical babble. If you are looking for believable characters with interesting motivations, well-crafted environments, and exciting and compelling storytelling then give this a pass.

One redeeming feature of the audio book is the excellent voice acting work of James Langton. It’s a shame the text isn’t anywhere near as good as his performance.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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