The Wolf Gift : The Wolf Gift

  • by Anne Rice
  • Narrated by Ron McLarty
  • Series: The Wolf Gift
  • 17 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

A daring new departure from the inspired creator of The Vampire Chronicles (“unrelentingly erotic... unforgettable” -The Washington Post), Lives of the Mayfair Witches (“Anne Rice will live on through the ages of literature” -San Francisco Chronicle), and the angels of The Songs of the Seraphim (“remarkable” -Associated Press). A whole new world - modern, sleek, high-tech - and at its center, a story as old and compelling as history: the making of a werewolf, reimagined and reinvented as only Anne Rice, teller of mesmerizing tales, conjurer extraordinaire of other realms, could create.
The time is the present.
The place, the rugged coast of Northern California. A bluff high above the Pacific. A grand mansion full of beauty and tantalizing history set against a towering redwood forest.
A young reporter on assignment from the San Francisco Observer... An older woman welcoming him into her magnificent family home that he has been sent to write about and that she must sell with some urgency... A chance encounter between two unlikely people... An idyllic night - shattered by horrific unimaginable violence, the young man inexplicably attacked - bitten - by a beast he cannot see in the rural darkness... A violent episode that sets in motion a terrifying yet seductive transformation, as the young man, caught between ecstasy and horror, between embracing who he is evolving into and fearing what he will become, soon experiences the thrill of the wolf gift.
As he resists the paradoxical pleasure and enthrallment of his wolfen savagery and delights in the power and (surprising) capacity for good, he is caught up in a strange and dangerous rescue and is desperately hunted as “the Man Wolf” by authorities, the media, and scientists (evidence of DNA threatens to reveal his dual existence)... As a new and profound love enfolds him, questions emerge that propel him deeper into his mysterious new world: questions of why and how he has been given this gift; of its true nature and the curious but satisfying pull towards goodness; of the profound realization that there may be others like him who are watching - guardian creatures who have existed throughout time who possess ancient secrets and alchemical knowledge. And throughout it all, the search for salvation for a soul tormented by a new realm of temptations, and the fraught, exhilarating journey, still to come, of being and becoming, fully, both wolf and man.

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What the Critics Say

“Rice weaves her trademark meditations on the role of supernatural creatures in society into an often thrilling, page-turning yarn.” (Booklist)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Terrible: Sex, Food, and Not Much Else

I usually don't leave reviews, but in this case I had to, just to warn people.

First off, it seems that the author was desperate and hungry when writing this book. Almost 60% of the entire story is made up of descriptions of sex and then food. There is regular sex, animal sex, soft sex, hard sex, loving sex, lusty sex... The list goes on. Then, there are long-winded descriptions of ordering food, eating food, and preparing food, down to salad preparation (usually followed by more sex, see above).

I mean, I don't have a problem with sex and food, I'm a single male, but I'd like a little progression of things. The author sets up a nice werewolf story, and then instead of progressing it AT ALL, it's just sex and food and not much of anything else. Meanwhile, there are all these questions posed, but none answered. I can't believe an editor told her this was a "book" and worthy of publishing.

I listen to books while driving to work, and with this one, I would be sitting there ready to drive the car into a telephone pole while rolling my eyes. The overly descriptive and repetitive sex and food are enough to drive you nuts, especially when the story is moving at a snail's pace. Perhaps she got paid by how many words she used or the overall weight of the book? I want things to happen in the book, but I find myself sitting there through sex scene, food scene, "love you" dialog, sex scene, food scene, fireplace scene (don't even get me started on how much time is spent playing with fireplace).

The dialog also shows that the author perhaps needs to interact with people more, and leave her mansion? She is completely out of the loop. No one talks like that in real life, and she writes the dialog as if the reader is 15 years old and will buy that. The way the character talks to parents is ridiculous, it is sooooo contrived, and also the loving talk with his gf. I mean, it would be nice if guys talked like this, but it isn't the case. Even movies these days know not to make up dialog because the audience calls BS. Not to mention, everyone in the book is "extremely handsome" and "beautiful'. Plus, what is with the very young and handsome main character having sex with several older (but very beautiful!) women? I mean, I'm not a brain surgeon (but I would like to perform some on myself while listening to this book) but I'm not buying this whole "older woman, younger handsome man" idea from an older female author. OK, maybe I would buy it once, but seemingly this ridiculously handsome guy just goes around jumping on amazingly good looking older ladies who throw themselves at him. Seriously, get over yourself and write a believable story, older author lady. All the "good" people are pretty and all the "bad" people aren't, its as if this was written by a five year old.

Finally, we have the fact that all the characters are extremely rich and well off and drive around in Porsches and live in mansions and throw money around. Great, we get it, the author is rich and completely out of touch. But after hearing the word "Porsche" about 400 times it gets old. I don't know, but when I talk about my car I don't call it "the BMW", I just called it "the car", as in "I'm getting in the car." or "they got in the car", not "I loaded up the Porsche" and "as he drove the Porsche". The author must have just purchased a new car or something because it is ridiculous how she can't get over it. I mean, I drive a very nice new car too but I just do not refer to it by the model/make like some stuck up crazy person. I think she also is turned on by the iPhone, or she got crazy money from Apple for product placement, because once again, she throws that word out there like its a raft to the drowning reader. Somehow I don't call my phone "the iPhone", I just call it "cellphone". Once again, this only becomes a barb in your eye when you hear it 400x over and over again.

Anyway, this is a classic example of terrible writing from a talented author. Either she put in zero effort, or she just has gotten too old to write, or she wrote this on her iPhone while driving to a date with a beautiful younger man in her Porsche after purchasing an older mansion in the woods somewhere. Either way, there is nothing of value here, especially when it is easy to see that the author has talent in setting up a plot and making descriptions, but then is completely unable to stay on track or actually keep their out-of-touch views from ruining it all.
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- Johnny Dough

Very disappointed

I have always been a fan or Anne Rice but this book was a huge let down.
A plot would have helped. It's much like a journal. Just giving the reader different things that happen to the writer. I managed to finish it somehow waiting on the plot or purpose to be reviled.
Maybe she was pushed by her publisher to get something written?

I have enjoyed many of her other books. She has made a good name of herself but that does not condone writing something and taking my hard earned money just because of who she is. She has gotten stale and lazy, riding out the fame of her name.... I am very disappointed.. don't waist a credit ..
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- leighda

Book Details

  • Release Date: 02-14-2012
  • Publisher: Random House Audio