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Publisher's Summary

In the India of 1942, two rapes take place simultaneously - that of an English girl in Mayapore, and that of India by the British. In each, physical violence, racial animosity, the coercion of the weak by the strong all play their part, but playing a part too are love, affection, loyalty, and recognition that the last division of all to be overcome is the colour of the skin. The whole spectrum of Anglo-Indian relations is vividly evoked in a brilliant assessment of emotions, personal clashes and historical reasons that eventually prised India - the jewel in the Imperial Crown - from its setting.
©1966 N.E. Avery Scott (P)2014 Audible, Inc.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Thomas on 11-07-11

Great Audio Book!

This is an engrossing story and the narrator gives a fantasic performance, with a different voice for each character. I wish he did the rest of the series but this seems to be the only volume available with him. Well worth listening to.

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9 of 9 people found this review helpful


By Jeremy on 10-28-14

This is one to get

Would you listen to The Jewel in the Crown again? Why?

I would listen to this again as it seems so rich in human experience that I expect to find more in it every time I read it.

What other book might you compare The Jewel in the Crown to and why?

It's often compared to A Passage To India, but Paul Scott's knowledge and interest in both India and the Raj clearly dwarfs Forster's. Forster's book is largely satire (and written long before the tragedies Scott describes), whereas Scott's much longer work feels populated with real people in serious situations.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

It made me laugh and cry, in equal measure.

Any additional comments?

Sam Dastor was born to narrate this book -- his astonishing mastery of a wide range of British and Indian accents, as well as characters, is unparallelled in my experience. Please somebody persuade him to perform the last three books in the series. I cannot imagine anyone else ever coming up to his standard.

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7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

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By K Bookworm on 02-27-15

Good start - where's the rest of the Raj Quartet?

What did you like most about The Jewel in the Crown?

It sets the scene well, beautifully written.

What other book might you compare The Jewel in the Crown to, and why?

Parade's End in another era, another place.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

What happened next?

Any additional comments?

I do hope you will obtain the rest of the quartet. It used to be available in cassettes.

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7 of 7 people found this review helpful


By Pamela Brooks George on 03-23-13

Mesmerising!

I enjoyed this so much. It is beautifully and sensitively read and had me transfixed for the full 21 or so hours. It is a wonderful story, which I knew well from the TV series, and it was fascinating to listen to the book where the details of the story are fleshed out. I am so disappointed that the other three books in the quartet are not available on audio. I do hope they will be soon and that they will be read by the same superb narrator - Sam Dastor.

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6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

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By Graeme H on 07-08-15

A fine work, beautifully read

This is no nostalgia-filled love look back to the Raj. It is a psychologically acute, and deeply thoughtful work about racism, colonialism and humans trying to connect.

Sam Dastor's reading is perfection.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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