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Publisher's Summary

Legendary Harvard religion scholar Harvey Cox offers up a new interpretation of the history and future of religion. Cox identifies three fundamental shifts over the last 2,000 years of church history:
The Age of Faith was when the early church was more concerned with following Jesus' teachings than enforcing what to believe about Jesus.
The Age of Belief marks a significant shift-between the fourth and twentieth centuries-when the church focused on orthodoxy and right beliefs.
The Age of the Spirit, that began in the 1960s and is shaping not just Christianity but other religious traditions today, is ignoring dogma and breaking down barriers between different religions. Spirituality is replacing formal religion.
Reflecting on how his own faith journey mirrors these three historical shifts, Cox personalizes the material in a compelling, practical ways. The Future of Faith is a major statement by one of the most revered theologians today.
©2009 Harvey Cox (P)2011 HarperCollins Publishers
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Customer Reviews

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3 out of 5 stars
By WETSU64 on 11-24-11

A subjective not objective view of Religion

I found fault with most of the authors assumptions and explanations. He denigrates beliefs and honors mysteries when they are of the same substance. I was angry during most of this book.

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2 of 4 people found this review helpful

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