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Publisher's Summary

The human imagination is the key battleground in the conflict between the kingdom of God and the consumer culture. Drawing from the vivid imaginations of Impressionist painters, particularly Vincent van Gogh, each chapter of The Divine Commodity uses personal narrative, biblical exposition, and cultural observation to show how consumerism has shaped our faith, and then challenges the listener to use their sanctified imagination to envision an alternative way of expressing the Christian life in our culture.
©2009 Skye Jethani (P)2009 Zondervan
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By tommie on 08-01-15

Good topic

I'm not sure why sky didn't narrate this himself. If you like this listen to him on the Phil Vischer podcasts.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

5 out of 5 stars
By Charlotte M. Sievert on 12-28-17

Something of Substance Throughout

Jethani seems to me to be an excellent thinker and writer and many of his observations and thoughts seem very Holy Spirit led. So often, when reading a non-fiction book, one reads the first 3 or 4 chapters and it seems that the rest of the book is devoted to a basic repetition of the same thoughts given in those first few chapters. Not true here. There is something to chew on in the beginning, middle, and to the very end. This is an important critique that we should all take to heart. Jethani widely counsels us to look first to how consumerism has twisted our own view of God and the church.

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