Tao Te Ching

  • by Lao Tsu (translated by Gia-fu Feng, Jane English)
  • Narrated by Dr. Jacob Needleman
  • 2 hrs and 0 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

The Tao Te Ching, a 6th century B.C. Chinese masterpiece, is one of the world's most revered sources of spiritual wisdom. This authoritative translation by Gia-fu Feng and Jane English captures the essence of Lao Tsu's language, bringing the Tao Te Ching's powerful message to a whole new generation of students. This collection is read by renowned philosopher and author Dr. Jacob Needleman, who also provides illuminating commentary on the text. This ancient classic presents timeless spiritual meditations on wisdom in action, illustrating important lessons that have resonated with its students for centuries.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Very good, indeed

My review of this book is as much a review of the book itself as well as the Audible presentation.

Many years ago a Taoist here in San Francisco said, "Buy this book. It will change your life!"

I did so, and it did. I think if you buy the book, and listen to this book, your view of life will indeed change, and for the better.

Some of the Tao "dicta" require analysis over a long period of time but I was amazed at how much the Tao applies to the modern way of American government. If we had followed its easy to understand advice, we would have saved literally a trillion dollars. This is a lot to get from one short little book.

This book is for the most intelligent and highly trained among us as well as gives counsel to those not quite there, yet.

The Tao gives advice that can be followed at the highest level of governance, and the advantage is that anyone at this level will appreciate the advice yet never ever have to admit to being a "Taoist."
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- Benedict

Tao Te Ching always great, but the naration hertoo

The Tao Te Ching is of course as always great, this version is also complemented by excellent thought provoking commentary at the end. But I think what sets this version apart is the narration. With the Tao Te Ching, it far to tempting to put into any reading of it an unneeded emphasis on certain words that implies a narrative that I don't think is necessarily intended by the author. For instance in some readings the narrator may simply emphasize certain words that make it sound like "ohhh this is really wise stuff here" or they may make it sound like the Tao Te Ching was written in the Matrix.. The narrator must put in some effort to separate his beliefs or feelings about the tao te ching or a particular topic with his reading of the Tao Te Ching. On the other hand, a computeristic reading can also be unpleasant and hard to listen to. I think Mr. Needleman gets the reading right with a nice flow, but nothing unneeded.
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- zrer10

Book Details

  • Release Date: 12-15-1999
  • Publisher: Phoenix Books