• Addicted to Mediocrity

  • 20th Century Christians and the Arts
  • By: Franky Schaeffer
  • Narrated by: Nick Bernard
  • Length: 2 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Release date: 03-20-06
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.
  • 3.5 out of 5 stars 3.6 (19 ratings)

Regular price: $9.07

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Publisher's Summary

In this provocative book, Franky Schaeffer shows how Christians today have sacrificed the artistic prominence they enjoyed for centuries and settled instead for mediocrity. The evidence for this sad state of affairs abounds. We are flooded with "Christian" doodads, trinkets, tee shirts, bumper stickers, etc., that use God's name as an advertising slogan: "Things Go Better with Jesus", putting the Creator of the universe on the same level as soda pop! Moreover, Schaeffer writes, "Whenever Christians, and evangelicals in particular, have attempted to 'reach the world' through the media, TV, film, publishing and so on, the thinking public gets the firm idea that, like soup in a bad restaurant, Christians' brains are best left unstirred."
©1981 Franky Schaeffer; (P)1992 Blackstone Audiobooks
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By Nate on 01-10-15

Arts Must Be Quality

I like that Franky doesn't just bash Christians' lack of quality in the arts, but really draws a line in the sand about quality in general. A few gems stuck with me, like his take on non-believers being called TO something. What is it? Is it sheep to call other sheep, or is it enjoyment in the life and creativity we are given? He sometimes goes a bit extreme with how much he downplays the importance of preaching and the church, but I like the concept of work and creativity being just as valid as missions and ministry.

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars
By charlene palmer on 02-19-18

Mediocre at best

Frankly I found this book quite mediocre and kind of mean spirited and arrogant. I agree with the basic premise but the read was not edifying.

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