• To the Best of Our Knowledge: Art vs. Science

  • By: Jim Fleming
  • Length: 52 mins
  • Radio/TV Program
  • Release date: 03-04-11
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Wisconsin Public Radio (To the Best of Our Knowledge)
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars 4.3 (3 ratings)

Regular price: $3.95

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Publisher's Summary

In this hour, Jonah Lehrer is the author of Proust Was a Neuroscientist. He tells Steve Paulson that the great French writer described insights into the way the mind processes memory long before the scientists could prove how the brain worked.
Next, Richard Holmes is an award-winning author of biographies of the great Romantic poets Shelley and Coleridge. His latest book is The Age of Wonder: The Romantic Generation and the Discovery of the Beauty and Terror of Science. He talks with Steve Paulson about how art and science influenced each other during the Romantic period, using as an example the work of the great astronomer William Herschel who was also a musician.
Then, Brian Boyd is the author of On the Origin of Stories: Evolution, Cognition and Fiction. He talks with Anne Strainchamps about how our love of storytelling helped us evolve. And his points are illustrated by Dustin Hoffman's reading of the Dr. Seuss classic "Horton Hears a Who!"
Finally, Dianna Dilworth is a film-maker and journalist. Her latest documentary is called Mellodrama: The Mellotron Movie. She tells Jim Fleming about the history of the Mellotron, and we hear several examples of its use in classic pop and rock music. [Broadcast Date: March 4, 2011]

Listen to:

  • Proust Was a Neuroscientist by Jonah Lehrer
  • The Age of Wonder by Melissa Bank
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