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Publisher's Summary

A Nobel laureate reveals the often surprising rules that govern a vast array of activities - both mundane and life-changing - in which money may play little or no role.
If you've ever sought a job or hired someone, applied to college or guided your child into a good kindergarten, asked someone out on a date or been asked out, you've participated in a kind of market. Most of the study of economics deals with commodity markets, where the price of a good connects sellers and buyers. But what about other kinds of "goods," like a spot in the Yale freshman class or a position at Google? This is the territory of matching markets, where "sellers" and "buyers" must choose each other, and price isn't the only factor determining who gets what.
Alvin E. Roth is one of the world's leading experts on matching markets. He has even designed several of them, including the exchange that places medical students in residencies and the system that increases the number of kidney transplants by better matching donors to patients. In Who Gets What - And Why, Roth reveals the matching markets hidden around us and shows how to recognize a good match and make smarter, more confident decisions.
©2015 Alvin E. Roth (P)2015 Brilliance Audio, all rights reserved.
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Martin Fierro on 03-18-16

What the Author Did On Summer Vacation

This book covers a lot of economics, and a fair amount of applied game theory, while talking principly of market design. Because I am deeply interested in each of these topics, I wanted to like it. I should have liked it. I struggled to like it. But in the end, my struggle was only partially successful.
Somehow it seemed to me that, again and again, the author disappointed. He obviously knows a great deal. But it seemed that rather than giving full measure of knowledge, the author was working overtime to impress. Something like the self-important essay my fourth grade teacher assigned the whole class to write: What I Did Over Summer Vacation.
They say, "If you done it, it ain't bragging!" but this author's rendition of historical events seemed (to me at least) to be almost as much about sounding impressive as it was about the principles that the author (and his grad students) applied.
I would have loved more exposition of the principles, and less of the principals, the chief of which always was the august author himself.
Perhaps some editor "made him do it" on the theory that narrative sells better than text book exposition. Fair enough. But looking back, I don't think that editor did me a service. The narrative porridge was too thin for my taste.

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7 of 7 people found this review helpful


By BlackBan88s on 10-20-15

Good book but lighter on substance than I hoped

Shortlisted this book after catching the authors interview on NPR but was expecting more details on market redesign. The book feels more like an introductory lecture/preview a grad school course. Pick this book up if you're considering following the author or one of his former students to the schools they're currently teaching at.

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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