Regular price: $45.63

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
Select or Add a new payment method

Buy Now with 1 Credit

By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Buy Now for $45.63

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Why do educated women get fewer responses on online dating websites? Is buying local food economically efficient? Does bribing kids improve their performance on school tests?
Steven Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner, the quirky geniuses behind Freakonomics, SuperFreakonomics, and Think Like a Freak, are back at it. For the last 10 years, they've used the tools of economics to answer some of our most unanswerable questions on the Freakonomics.com blog. Here, for the first time, the very best of their more than 8,000 posts are together in a single place. We learn why it's so hard to predict the Kentucky Derby, why babies born in summer tend to score lower on standardized tests, and why rich people tend to be happier than poor people but rich countries no happier than poor ones. When to Rob a Bank showcases the brilliance that has made Levitt and Dubner an international sensation and the eloquence and wit that has always made them such a joy to read and listen to.
©2015 Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner (P)2015 HarperCollins Canada
Show More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Don on 04-27-17

It's simply the best of the Freakonomics blog

It's similar to the other books in their series but takes small excerpts, updates, and guest speakers from the long running Freakonomics blog to compile the next chapter in the saga

Read More Hide me

By Brett on 05-24-16

The Weakest of the Four.

The Weakest of the Freakonomics books, but still very entertaining and enlightening. I highly recommend.

Read More Hide me
See all Reviews
© Copyright 1997 - 2017 Audible, Inc