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Publisher's Summary

With Friedrich Nietzsche, philosophy was dangerous not only for philosophers but for everyone. Nietzsche ended up going mad, but his ideas presaged a collective madness that had horrific consequences in Europe in the early 1900s. Though his philosophy is more one of aphorisms and insights than a system, it is brilliant, persuasive, and incisive. His major concept is the will to power, which he saw as the basic impulse for all our acts. Christianity he saw as a subtle perversion of this concept, thus Nietzsche's famous pronouncement, "God is dead." In Nietzsche in 90 Minutes, Paul Strathern offers a concise, expert account of Nietzsche's life and ideas and explains their influence on man's struggle to understand his existence in the world.
©1996 Paul Strathern (P)2003 Blackstone Audiobooks
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Peter on 09-21-04

A short biography

The best part of this book is the sketch of Nietzsche's life. Strathern does well here. He balances this with a glimpse (and it's only a glimpse) into his philosophy. As usual, such a brief taste of a philosopher can give a distorted view his work, but if Strathern's work is taken for what it is -- and invitation to look further -- it can be very usful. Ignore (or investigate further) some of Strathern's simplistic descriptions of some of Nietzsche's thought and you'll have fun with Whitfield's reading.

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9 of 10 people found this review helpful


By Mark G on 07-17-04

Shallow and misleading

This book is close to worthless. A great philosopher receives a high handed, patronizing treatment from an intellectual midget, the author, who reviews important concepts that he does not understand through the lens of politically correct cliches of our times. The inappropriately patronizing tone of the narrator, who is quite lost as to where to apply emphasis or ironical tone (so he does that randomly) is irritating. My advice is save your time and money. I should have taken the trouble to listen to an excerpt.

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25 of 35 people found this review helpful

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