Men in Black

  • by Mark R. Levin
  • Narrated by Jeff Riggenbach
  • 8 hrs and 0 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

The Supreme Court endorses terrorists' rights, flag burning, and importing foreign law. Is that in the Constitution? You're right: it's not. But these days the Constitution is no restraint on our out-of-control Supreme Court. The Court imperiously strikes down laws and imposes new ones purely on its own arbitrary whims. Even though liberals like John Kerry are repeatedly defeated at the polls, the majority on the allegedly "conservative" Supreme Court reflects their views and wields absolute power. There's a word for this: tyranny.
In Men in Black, radio talk-show host and legal scholar Mark R. Levin dissects the judicial tyranny that is robbing us of our freedoms and stuffing the ballot box in favor of liberal policies.
If you've ever wondered why, no matter who holds political power, American society always seems to drift to the left, Mark Levin has the answer: the black-robed justices of the Supreme Court, subverting democracy in favor of their own liberal agenda.
Decades of judicial activism have made the Supreme Court the most potent threat to American freedom. Men in Black, as Rush Limbaugh writes in his introduction, "couldn't be more timely or important, as liberals continue shamelessly to thwart the people, Congress, the president, and state governments by using the courts to dictate national policy....Men in Black is a tremendously important and compelling book."
It could very well be the most important book you hear this year.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Recommended reading.

Mark Levin treats us to an excellent argument against the subjugation of America to nine Justices. Among his chief arguments are the following: Judges are no wiser than their fellow men; Judges should refrain from making policy decisions because they are exempt from the elective control; and Common Law is a perversion of Constitutional checks and balances.

Some reviewers are correct: You can have a good sense of this work before hand, but people, who have heard Levin's radio show, will be pleasantly surprised at the calm, rational discussion in the work. A professional reader adds as much, but this work is far from the incendiary provocation that Democrats assert. To them, the real crime is the shattering of the legal analysis (or lack of it) and holding of Roe in "Death by Privacy."

Would his thesis require releasing some 'rights' acquired in a 'Living Constitution?' Sure, but should we not expect our government to operate within its framework? After all, the Framers provided provisions and methods to amend the Constitution.

Of course, the Framers of the Constitution were far from a uniform body of people. (Alexander Hamilton sought a strengthened federal government and was deeply opposed by Thomas Jefferson.) However, Levin simply presents the words of Justices to prove his case. Doubt me? Take a look at the online retailers that provide previewable sections.

It’s a work that I think everyone should “read.” I would also recommend that all political junkies check out the following works:

Ron Chernow’s Alexander Hamilton (only abridgement I’ve liked);
Bill Clinton’s My Life;
Jimmy Carter’s Our Endangered Values (Although you’ll want to read it because apparently chose to read it with a mouthful of marbles. I will never know how it won an audiobook award.);
Tom Delay’s No Retreat, No Surrender;
And John Stossel’s Give Me a Break.
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- Jay Kuykendall

A concise account of an originalist viewpoint

First off, Levin is Rush Limbaugh's lawyer, so know what you're getting before you buy.
Beyond that, I think he does a good job defending his viewpoint that the originalist take on the Constitution is the proper one. If one looks at why Justice Ginsberg and Justice Thomas are almost always on opposite side of issues, this book does a good job of defining why Thomas takes the side he takes, and no consideration is made to defend Ginsberg.
Because Levin has such a problem with those who subscribe to the Living Constitution arguement, don't expect a defense of that at all.
Overall, I think it is good for what it is. Read it like you would a long editorial in a newspaper.
If you look at the law conservatively, this book my help you understand the legal defense of that view. If you are more liberal, this may at least help you understand why the other side sees things so differently.
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- James

Book Details

  • Release Date: 03-25-2005
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.