Regular price: $6.95

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
Select or Add a new payment method

Buy Now with 1 Credit

By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Buy Now for $6.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

When tough-on-crime laws passed 30 years ago during an era of drug-fueled violence, they were supported across the political spectrum. The subsequent "war on drugs" sent non-violent offenders to prison for decades and, in some cases, life.
As a result, the nation's prison and jail population today is 2.3 million, more than quadruple the number that were incarcerated in 1980. One in 100 adults is behind bars in America. As many as 100 million American adults now have criminal records, and a disproportionate number of those are men of color.
Washington Post reporters, in a series of revealing and wrenching stories throughout 2015, unlocked the prison gates and allowed listeners to experience the human devastation wrought by sentencing policies now under scrutiny.
©2015 The Washington Post (P)2016 Audible, Inc.
Show More Show Less

Critic Reviews

"Several reporters at the Washington Post have filed insightful stories in recent years about the actual repercussions of drug trade suppression laws on the most disenfranchised members of civic life. The extreme prison sentences meted out to low-level illicit drug dealers and the prison conditions they experience form the thematic base of the collection. James Edward Thomas reads the reports with aplomb and without offering any auditory cues between the reporters' own words and the sources quoted. This is a basic introduction to some major flaws in the legal system that do indeed prevent it from purveying justice. (AudioFile Magazine)
Show More Show Less
No Reviews are Available