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Publisher's Summary

Thing 1: There is no such thing as the free market.
Thing 4: The washing machine has changed the world more than the Internet.
Thing 5: Assume the worst about people, and you get the worst.
Thing 13: Making rich people richer doesn't make the rest of us richer.
If you've wondered how we did not see the economic collapse coming, Ha-Joon Chang knows the answer: We didn't ask what they didn't tell us about capitalism. This is a lighthearted book with a serious purpose: to question the assumptions behind the dogma and sheer hype that the dominant school of neoliberal economists - the apostles of the freemarket - have spun since the Age of Reagan.
Chang, the author of the international best seller Bad Samaritans, is one of the world's most respected economists, a voice of sanity - and wit - in the tradition of John Kenneth Galbraith and Joseph Stiglitz.
23 Things They Don't Tell You About Capitalism equips listeners with an understanding of how global capitalism works - and doesn't. In his final chapter, "How to Rebuild the World", Chang offers a vision of how we can shape capitalism to humane ends, instead of becoming slaves of the market.
Ha-Joon Chang teaches in the Faculty of Economics at the University of Cambridge. His books include the best-selling Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism. His Kicking Away the Ladder received the 2003 Myrdal Prize, and, in 2005, Chang was awarded the Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought.
©2011 Ha-Joon Chang (P)2011 Audible, Inc.
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Critic Reviews

"Shaking Economics 101 assumptions to the core … Eminently accessible, with a clearly liberal (or at least anticonservative) bent, but with surprises along the way—for one, the thought that markets need to become less rather than more efficient." (Kirkus Reviews)
"An advocate of big, active government and capitalism as distinct from a free market, Chang presents an enlightening précis of modern economic thought - and all the places it's gone wrong, urging us to act in order to completely rebuild the world economy: 'This will make some readers uncomfortable... it is time to get uncomfortable.'" (Publishers Weekly)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Christopher Deaton on 05-03-16

Interesting but complicated

Pretty interesting but some parts were a little complicated to someone like me. I understand some basic economics but some of the things he discusses are fairly technical and in depth. Still very interesting nonetheless

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8 of 8 people found this review helpful


By TB on 10-26-15

Definitely contrarian but Many Arguments are thin.

Overall I thing Chang was successful in offering up an alternative viewpoint to the free-market capitalism rhetoric that is prominent in certain circles. However I find some of the arguments presented very thin and I do believe that Chang picks and chooses historical perspective when it suits his argument. I also believe that he does over-simplify many arguments for the his opposition. With that said, in other respects he does present data and case studies that suggest that the "free-market" policies should be more scrutinized and not taken as common sense.

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8 of 8 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Derek Carrillo on 11-28-12

Very short review.

Loved this book, well thought out and fascinating insight in to capitalism. I hold a lot of the same view as the author but regardless I think more people should know of the underlying problems with our current system.



After listening to the book I can no longer hear a news report when the word "deregulation" is mentioned without me thinking back to this book, and thinking who it is really benefiting?

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6 of 7 people found this review helpful


By nev on 03-31-17

Brilliant!

Loved it. Learned a lot about how politics speak, and how rubbish it truly is.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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