• A Korea Whole and Free

  • Why Unifying the Peninsula Won’t Be So Bad After All
  • By: Sue Mi Terry
  • Narrated by: Kevin Stillwell
  • Length: 25 mins
  • Periodical
  • Release date: 08-19-14
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Foreign Affairs
  • 4 out of 5 stars 4.0 (1 rating)

Regular price: $1.95

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
Select or Add a new payment method

Buy Now with 1 Credit

By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Buy Now for $1.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Add to Library for $0.00

By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Contrary to popular belief, the reunification of North Korea and South Korea would not spell disaster for South Korea, nor would it pose an unacceptable risk for the United States, China, and Japan. Rather, it would produce massive economic and social benefits for the peninsula and the region.
©2014 Foreign Affairs (P)2014 Audible, Inc.
Show More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Zakkisgod on 01-15-18

A point of view for a United Korean

The brief overview of a unification of North and South Korea is a noble vision. The information is good but closes the door on the how to unite the two countries. The information lack other local countries in the area and how they could support unification. The focus is on the big brothers in the region. The author failed to define what is new capitalism that the United Korean economy would run. This information has allot of unanswered questions point to the need for a larger and more details analysis in how this path was chosen.

Read More Hide me

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

See all Reviews