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Publisher's Summary

In the tradition of The Stand, The Man in the High Castle, and The Road comes an epic story of struggle against tyranny in a future America....
The year is 2141. Islam controls most of the civilized world, including all that exists of the former United States. Climate change has made fresh drinking water a scarce and valuable commodity. Islamic states that once controlled oil now control the largest fresh water deposit in the world, the American Great Lakes.
Washington, D.C., and New York City are mere memories of the old world as a new regime of Caliphs has ruled the eastern half of the country for the past century. The barren no-man's-land east of the Mississippi River is but an encroaching desert, and the realm of the Great Lakes - known as Al-hayat Miyaah - dictates life for the rest of the realm.
Jihadic allegiance and the Lakes' bounty decide a person's worth, where clean, drinkable water is far more precious than gold... and more valuable than the lives of infidels.
In this hostile environment, Joaquin Martinez and six others risk certain death as fugitives crossing state lines to reclaim loved ones stolen from Hernando, Mississippi, and sold into slavery in Detroit. Meanwhile, survivalist Malcolm Foster and his daughter Renee begin a journey to Kentucky with other survivalists hoping to strike a blow to the Muslim empire. Lastly, in the heart of Al-hayat Miyaah, the youngest son of the Caliph, Abdul-Bari, sets out on a quest to determine the truth about infidels... their worthiness of scorn and indiscriminate death.
Much is at stake for them all, as a crossing of paths determines who inevitably is destined to win... and who must lose everything.
©2016 Aiden James (P)2017 Timothy McKean/Aiden James
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By Natalie @ ABookLoversLife on 12-29-17

Frightening but slow.

The summary sums up the plot perfectly.... "The year is 2141. Islam controls most of the civilized world, including all that exists of the former United States. Climate change has made fresh drinking water a scarce, and valuable, commodity. Islamic states that once controlled the oil now control the largest fresh water deposit in the world, the American Great Lakes." Life is extremely hard for everyone and only promises to get tougher because the Fourth Caliph of the Bashir dynasty, Abdul-Muttalib Bashir, plans on making life for the infidels even harder! But a band of revolutionists won't take this lying down and will do anything they can to get rid of their oppressors.

This book was truly original and very frightening, but it was also extremely long and boring at times. I know the authors had a lot of world building to do, but honestly, there were times that I wanted to give up reading, and I think a big part of the problem was the narrator, which I'll get to in a minute.

The plot of this was intriguing, interesting, but very frightening. It shows us a world where the ruling families word is law, where human life doesn't mean anything to them and what extremism looks like. We get to see the story told from the ruling family, their son, who doesn't like the way his family handles things, from a group of people who are trying to retrieve their family members who were taken, and from the people who want freedom and will do anything to get it.

It makes for difficult reading at times, especially seeing how they treat their slaves and how they treat women. The fact that you can get killed on the spot for saying something against their beliefs, is but a drop in the bucket at what they do. It really was frightening to read!!!

I think I may have enjoyed it more if I read it rather than listen to it because the narrator read the story but didn't perform it. By that I mean, he was very monotone while reading and didn't put much inflection into his narration, so it all kind of ran together and didn't come alive. His tones for the Muslim men were also all the same, so I didn't know who was talking at any given time and was confused. I found myself tuning out at times because I just wasn't drawn into the story.

I was voluntarily provided this audiobook for free from the author, narrator, or publisher. This in no way affected nor influenced my thoughts.

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3 of 3 people found this review helpful

3 out of 5 stars
By Brian on 12-29-17

Frighteningly Real But Not Perfect

The year is 2141. Islam controls most of the civilized world, including all that exists of the former United States. Climate change has made fresh drinking water a scarce, and valuable, commodity. Islamic states that once controlled the oil now control the largest fresh water deposit in the world, the American Great Lakes.

I always worry about starting a book that is this long. The print version comes in at a whopping 548 pages. A lot of times books that are this long would benefit from a few things - and editor that isn't scared to tell the author to delete things, turning it into a "series" (splitting it up), or cutting out some of the unnecessary "building" pieces. I know that comparing a book to Stephen King is a compliment, but in my eyes, it isn't always. King will write 5 pages on what the inside of a diner looks like when all we need is 1-2 paragraphs. This book fell into the last category for sure and probably could have been cut into at least 2 stories. Ironically in the description, it compares itself to a Stephen King novel -- so maybe I'm crazy for thinking that it's a bad thing.

The biggest thing that I got out of this book was that it was very realistic and because of that, it was incredibly frightening. I like when a story can feel original and unique like this. I just wish that it had been a little shorter or less wordy.

The narration itself took away from this book too. I don't like to talk badly about narrator since I know that the craft is incredibly difficult and this is just my opinion, but it was a little too monotone for me. There wasn't a lot of "storytelling" inflection and voice changes (in a story that needed it).

Overall, a book that I liked and disliked all the same. I think if you are a Stephen King fan you would enjoy this. If you don't like the way that King writes you might want to avoid it.

I was voluntarily provided with a copy of this book. It has not affected my review in any way.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By Simon on 11-25-17

Doesn't Quite Hit The Mark!

This book sets out a genuinely scary apocalyptic scenario. Climate change ravages the world, a weakened US succumbs to invasion and what remains of the country falls under a brutal Islamic regime. No need for zombies or super plagues just an intriguingly possible scenario. I was concerned that the authors would fall into the trap of making it a typical good Christians vs Bad Muslims slugfest but they avoided that in some style with lots of shades of grey and internal conflict within the main character groups. The story is fast-moving and there is considerable tension and excitement as two groups set themselves against the dominant Islamic powers.

It's not a bad read at all but it didn't quite hit the mark for me. The narration by Timothy McKean is clear and concise but it's much more of a reading than a performance. He's really not helped by some rather stilted dialogue which sees most of the characters speaking as if making a political speech or giving a lecture of some kind rather than interacting naturally. I'd also say that the whole thing is very logistically naive with armies of 20,000 troops mobilising in scant hours and I don't think the authors seem to have a great understanding of weapons or tactics.

So, it's one that's worth a try. It sets a great scenario and a good set of characters take part in a fast-moving adventure but it didn't light any fireworks for me.

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7 of 9 people found this review helpful

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