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Publisher's Summary

In Donna Leon's Commissario Guido Brunetti series, the Venetian inspector has been called on to investigate many things, from shocking to petty crimes. But in The Waters of Eternal Youth, the 25th novel in this celebrated series, Brunetti finds himself drawn into a case that may not be a case at all.
Fifteen years ago a teenage girl fell into a canal late at night. Unable to swim, she went under and started to drown, surviving only thanks to a nearby man, an alcoholic, who heard her splashes and pulled her out, though not before she suffered irreparable brain damage that left her in a state of permanent childhood, unable to learn or mature. The drunk man claimed he saw her thrown into the canal by another man, but the following day he couldn't remember a thing.
Now, at a fundraising dinner for a Venetian charity, a wealthy and aristocratic patroness - the girl's grandmother - asks Brunetti if he will investigate. Brunetti's not sure what to do. If a crime was committed, it would surely have passed the statute of limitations. But out of a mixture of curiosity, pity, and a willingness to fulfill the wishes of a guilt-wracked older woman who happens to be his mother-in-law's best friend, he agrees. Brunetti soon finds himself unable to let the case rest, if indeed there is a case.
Awash in the rhythms and concerns of contemporary Venetian life, from historical preservation to housing to new waves of African migrants, and the haunting story of a woman trapped in a damaged perpetual childhood, The Waters of Eternal Youth is another wonderful addition to this series.
©2016 Donna Leon and Diogenes Verlag AG, Zurich (P)2016 Recorded Books
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Chris on 04-25-16

Leon & Colacci - Perfect

Would you consider the audio edition of The Waters of Eternal Youth to be better than the print version?

Absolutely. Author and narrator - great match,

Did the plot keep you on the edge of your seat? How?

Not "edge of your seat" novel. Leon pens soul stirring mysteries plunging the listener deep into the hearts of her characters.

Have you listened to any of David Colacci’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Have listened to many Colacci's narrations. One of my favorites.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Will tear at your heart.

Any additional comments?

Looking forward to the next book.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful


By Cynthia on 04-12-16

Her usual thought-provoking human mystery.

Would you consider the audio edition of The Waters of Eternal Youth to be better than the print version?

I haven't read the print version for this book. I find that movies, and audible performances can change the author's intention. Some are better than the written book. Others I cannot abide the narrator and would much prefer the book. And then some video productions outshine the book. But, it always starts with the author.

Which character – as performed by David Colacci – was your favorite?

Guido and Ms. Electra (i apologize for the spelling as I'm not sure what how the secretary's name is spelt.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

This book was a little easier on the reader and it was somewhat less a societal criticism as her other books. The crime and the response to it could have taken place in many countries. Ms. Leon doesn't criticize the Establishment as much as she does in her usual gentle way.

Any additional comments?

I enjoyed this book slightly more as it had fewer scenes of family bliss and more with the men and women Bernetti works with.<br/>I must say the food descriptions are so well done that my stomach actually growls when we hear what is for lunch or dinner. (supper)

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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