The Untethered

  • by S.W. Southwick
  • Narrated by Fred Filbrich
  • 21 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

A contemporary epic thriller.
A juvenile delinquent chases his dream to build the greatest aircraft in history - and the world tries to stop him. A rising political star runs from her childhood dream - and the world encourages her on. A self-loathing geneticist hides below the streets of Las Vegas - and rebels against the whole world. An artist tries to make his father proud - at the cost of everything he loves.
When all four lives collide, each must make a choice - and the world will never be the same.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

An incredible saga

What did you love best about The Untethered?

The were multiple story lines and merged together as the plot unfolded.


What did you like best about this story?

I loved how Roble never gave up on his dream and along the way he gathered other like minded people who used his strength to attain their dreams.


What does Fred Filbrich bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

The audiobook allowed the reader to experience flight in a unique and riveting way as the book unfolded.


Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I book may be 21 hours long, but it didn't feel like that I was drawn into the story along with the characters.


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- Teresa

Excellent writing! Is a much needed modern spin.

For a significant part of [the beginning of] this book, though I was enjoying it, I was a little bit turned off by what seemed like an imitation of Atlas Shrugged or The Fountainhead. The philosophy, mood, characters and even some specific character relationships seemed almost identical. Eventually though, as I got to know the characters and story more, I didn’t feel that way. Yes, it is very similar to Rand’s novels. And of course it represents, in a way, an appreciative nod to her works. But it doesn’t change the fact that it’s excellently written. The characters become near and dear, and I experienced emotion, frustration, elation, and pride, while reading. I even recognized some character traits and choices that weren’t admirable that I could see in myself, and it made me commit more deeply to move past those.

Each individual character story and development keeps the reader engaged. The research was well done, so even though I know nothing about jets, tennis, military, etc., it was instantly believable and impressive to me, yet digestible.

The pacing is good. There are a lot of details, but there are plenty of places where too many details could have been included, but they weren’t. The book “cut” well, the way a film cuts from scene to scene to channel the plot forward.

Even though some might call it “slow” at the beginning, it doesn’t feel that way. You get to know the characters better and better, and since years are passing, their relationships, passions, and personal evolutions, seem more believable. Then, there are a solid several hours of action at the end! Definitely keeps you hooked.

Probably the best thing to me was the much-needed modern take on objectivism. The book involves multiple races and cultures and sexual preferences. There was an equal emphasis on men as there was on women. One of my favorite moments was when a female refused equal pay with a male, because she hadn’t earned it, or provided the same value as the man had in that particular situation. If she had, she would have deserved equal pay. The book equalizes everything. Rather than trying to “make up” for anything in the past by overcompensating, the protagonists are steady and firm about living as they philosophically view as correct, and as will allow them to reach the greatest success and excellence. Just as I’m writing this I am thinking of SpaceX and Elon Musk’s passion, and his desire for an open market in rockets, in order to cultivate excellence.

In general, the novel questions many societal norms and makes you ask yourself why we consider something to be acceptable, and why so many people conform to endless laws and customs when they might not serve individuals at all (which means they will not serve society as a whole, either). Some of Rand’s novels come off as selfish—I don’t always agree with that assessment, and I think an author often has to be extreme to make a point. But, if anything, I think this novel was even less selfish than Rand’s and pointed out the fact that there are all kinds of ways to serve others; most of them are not gov’t sanctioned! An emphasis on the importance of self-fulfillment is of course a huge theme. I also think that it is more positive and less cynical than Rand's novels.

The last several hours kept me completely hooked! It was super fulfilling because I’d learned so much about each of the characters up to the point, that I was deeply invested in them. Plus, the very end left me with chills, which is always a good sign ;)

I’m glad I bought this book, and I bought a copy for my brother before I was even a third the way through it. Wish I could read it for the first time again. Highly recommend!
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- bombadillo

Book Details

  • Release Date: 04-13-2017
  • Publisher: Roble Arrow Publishing Ink