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Publisher's Summary

Praised by Lee Child and Karin Slaughter, and sure to thrill fans of The Girl on the Train and The Widow, The Marsh King's Daughter is mesmerizing psychological suspense, the story of a woman who must risk everything to hunt down the dangerous man who shaped her past and threatens to steal her future: her father.
At last, Helena Pelletier has the life she deserves. A loving husband, two beautiful daughters, a business that fills her days. Then she catches an emergency news announcement and realizes she was a fool to think she could ever leave her worst days behind her.
Helena has a secret: she is the product of an abduction. Her mother was kidnapped as a teenager by her father and kept in a remote cabin in the marshlands of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. No electricity, no heat, no running water, not a single human beyond the three of them. Helena, born two years after the abduction, loved her home in nature - fishing, tracking, hunting. And despite her father's odd temperament and sometimes brutal behavior, she loved him, too...until she learned precisely how savage a person he could be.
More than 20 years later, she has buried her past so soundly that even her husband doesn't know the truth. But now her father has killed two guards, escaped from prison, and disappeared into the marshland he knows better than anyone else in the world. The police commence a manhunt, but Helena knows they don't stand a chance. Knows that only one person has the skills to find the survivalist the world calls the Marsh King - because only one person was ever trained by him: his daughter.
©2017 Karen Dionne (P)2017 Penguin Audio
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Critic Reviews

"Narrator Emily Rankin's buttery voice smoothly delivers Dionne's psychological thriller.... The complicated tension between daughter and father, and wanting to know how she and her mother escaped the marsh years, keeps one listening." (AudioFile)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Cayce on 06-16-17

I wanted to like this...

I wanted to like this book. The blurb sounded great and the mention of Karin Slaughter and Lee Child made me think it was going to be a thriller. So maybe expectation was partly to blame for my lukewarm response.

This book is slow and filled with detail about living in the wild in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The writer is good and if you like detail filled fiction or stories about living in nature and how to survive with your hands and makeshift tools, then you will likely enjoy this book. But I play books in the background while I edit photos and I need them to move more quickly than this.

I'm also not sure the narrator did this book any favors. The woman's voice is innocent sounding with a slight singsongy quality. It really grated on my nerves after awhile. The long descriptions of hunting and killing the animals and how wonderful she thought her father was went on way too long for me.

It's possible this book picks up in the second half, but I couldn't get that far. Check out the sample and make sure the narration doesn't drive you nuts.

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9 of 10 people found this review helpful


By smccoy on 07-18-17

Disappointment

I didn't enjoy this audio book. The narrator was good, but I hated the characters. All of them. Could find no sympathy for the daughter or father's behavior. The mother was only one I could muster any sympathy for. Ridiculous amount of description and detail. If you don't mind slow, plodding and depressing stories, this one might be for you. What a bummer.

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2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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