The Final Page of Baker Street : Sherlock Holmes and the American Literati

  • by Daniel D Victor
  • Narrated by Ben Carling
  • Series: Sherlock Holmes and the American Literati
  • 5 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

When misadventure led a schoolboy in London to employment at Baker Street, few could have guessed where his introduction to Sherlock Holmes would lead. But as the lad matures and he finds himself caught in the middle of a murder investigation, his friendship with Holmes and Watson lures him into the role of detective. 'Billy' documents his experiences, and soon his sleuthing skills not only bring him to another murder, but also lay the foundation for his metamorphosis into a famous mystery writer, the novelist the world now knows as Raymond Chandler.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

An entertaining story, excellent new narrator!

What did you love best about The Final Page of Baker Street?

The story follows in the vein of Arthur Conan Doyle. You will become immersed in the story through the strength of the narration. The seamless transition from one character to the next draws you into the story. The combination of Daniel Victor's writing with Ben Carling's narration is a potent combination. Upon finishing this book I immediately searched for others by this combination.


Who was your favorite character and why?

The character of John Watson, as any reader of Conan Doyle will know, is the internal narrator of the story. I found Daniel Victor's version very entertaining.


Which character – as performed by Ben Carling – was your favorite?

This is a difficult choice because the narrator gave an excellent performance. I suppose the character of Sherlock Holmes, although not a constant or frequent character for dialog, was my favorite. Ben Carling's portrayal of the character was excellent. It was just as I imagined the character of Sherlock Holmes to be.


Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I found it difficult to stop listening to this book. Also, this is a relatively short book. I found myself wanting there to be more. As the book wrapped up I was surprised to find that 6 hours had passed by.


Any additional comments?

As an observation, there were 3 or 4 "re-reads" of sentences in the body of the story. These are places that a narrator re-reads the text and then they are normally edited out. I understand this excellent story is getting a quick re-edit to remove those. It is a minor observation and I expect by the time my rating is live it will be fixed. This is an excellent book that you will want to share with your family and friends. Based on the strength of author's words and the excellent narration I am sharing it with mine.

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- thebladerunner

Great gimmick, great narration, clunky story

Great gimmick but I never would have made it to the end if the audio narration weren’t so good. The gimmick is that a young Raymond Chandler meets up with a retired Sherlock Holmes and they team up on a case that sets the stage for Chandler’s future writing career focusing on double crosses and beautiful women. The text reads, though, like someone did a massive amount of research and then felt compelled to dump it all didactically into a book. People who like to study Arthur Conan Doyle and Chandler books will probably get a kick out of it, but my take is that the notes are there but not the music. The excerpts from Chandler’s real works at the top of each chapter are brilliant while Chandler’s fictional dialogue in the book is clunky. Excerpt of something a young Chandler says in casual conversation: “It’s as if all that British formalism in language can do is to produce a criticism of form and manners. In America, I expect more unrestricted opportunities.” Again, the audio narration, with its distinct and fun voices for each character, helped the clunky passages go down smoothly. Bechdel test: fail. Grade: C.
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- Mark

Book Details

  • Release Date: 06-22-2016
  • Publisher: MX Publishing