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Publisher's Summary

Now a major motion picture starring Tom Hanks and Audrey Tautou. While in Paris on business, Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon receives an urgent late-night phone call: the elderly curator of the Louvre has been murdered inside the museum. Near the body, police have found a baffling cipher. While working to solve the enigmatic riddle, Langdon is stunned to discover it leads to a trail of clues hidden in the works of Da Vinci, clues visible for all to see, yet ingeniously disguised by the painter.
Langdon joins forces with a gifted French cryptologist, Sophie Neveu, and learns the late curator was involved in the Priory of Sion, an actual secret society whose members included Sir Isaac Newton, Botticelli, Victor Hugo, and Da Vinci, among others.
In a breathless race through Paris, London, and beyond, Langdon and Neveu match wits with a faceless powerbroker who seems to anticipate their every move. Unless Langdon and Neveu can decipher the labyrinthine puzzle in time, the Priory's ancient secret, and an explosive historical truth, will be lost forever.
As a special bonus, this audio edition includes Dan Brown's October 2005 speech at the University of New Hampshire, introduced by his father. The author discusses the research behind his groundbreaking novel and the controversy it has created. Also, listen to an exclusive interview with Akiva Goldsman, screenwriter of The Da Vinci Code.
Can't get enough of The Da Vinci Code? Check out our store devoted to all things Da Vinci.
©2003 Dan Brown (P)2003 Books On Tape, Inc.
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Critic Reviews

"In this gleefully erudite suspense novel, Mr. Brown takes the format...to blockbuster perfection." (The New York Times)
"Brown solidifies his reputation as one of the most skilled thriller writers on the planet with his best book yet, a compelling blend of history and page-turning suspense." (Library Journal)
"Many notches above the intelligent thriller; this is pure genius." (Nelson DeMille)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
3 out of 5 stars
By E. Baxter on 11-13-03

Adjust Your Perspective...

It's important for readers to understand, as many previous reviewers do not, that not all books are works of literature. Chances are that if you are purchasing a(n)(audio)book that appears on the New York Times Bestseller List, it has most of the characteristics that the Average Joe looks for in a book: entertaining, fast-paced, transparent, filled with action (as opposed to thought), and sex.

Although "The Da Vinci Code" features a prudish protagonist that precludes much of the latter, it does serve up an orgy of controversial historical facts that will prod all but the most closed-minded of readers to question their beliefs and research the presented details further. If the indignant one-star-reviewers wanted character development they should have bought some Saul Bellow or Philip Roth. The self-proclaimed writer who fumed, "I wrote better in the 3rd grade" should check her ego and realize that this effective piece of entertainment isn't trying to be deft with the English Language, just thought provoking and fun. I find it funny that those who thought the reading and the book itself was so unbearably horrendous wasted 15+ hours listening to the purported drivel.

Ultimately, this book is great for those who have an interest in religious history and don't mind the cliched plotline and hackneyed characters roughed-in to deliver the truly interesting ideas on the roots of Christianity and the rise of patriarchal society.

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77 of 93 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars
By M.W. on 04-26-04

Surprised at the negative reviews...

I've read some of the reviews of this book and find them surprising. I found the book entertaining, thought provoking, and somewhat educational. I agree with one reviewer that the people who have a problem with this book probably object more to the theme than its plot or how the story is constructed.

I found the reader to be very good, too. I'm not going to get picky about how well someone does a foreign accent. If they get too authentic I probably won't be able to understand what they are saying! Hey, I'm trying to drive while I listen. I value clear diction and good pacing.

In all, if you are looking for an entertaining book, listen to this one.

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16 of 20 people found this review helpful

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