The Columbus Affair

  • by Steve Berry
  • Narrated by Scott Brick
  • 16 hrs and 1 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

He was called by many names - Columb, Colom, Col - but we know him as Christopher Columbus. Many questions about him exist: Where was he born, raised, and educated? Where did he die? How did he discover the New World? None have ever been properly answered. And then there is the greatest secret of all....
From Steve Berry, New York Times best-selling author, comes an exciting new adventure - one that challenges everything we thought we knew about the discovery of America.
Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Tom Sagan has written hard-hitting articles from hot spots around the world. But when a controversial report from a war-torn region is exposed as a fraud, his professional reputation crashes and burns. Now he lives in virtual exile - haunted by bad decisions and the shocking truth he can never prove: That his downfall was a deliberate act of sabotage by an unknown enemy. But before Sagan can end his torment with the squeeze of a trigger, fate intervenes in the form of an enigmatic stranger with a request that cannot be ignored.
Zachariah Simon has the look of a scholar, the soul of a scoundrel, and the zeal of a fanatic. He also has Tom Sagan's estranged daughter at his mercy. Simon desperately wants something only Sagan can supply: the key to a 500-year-old mystery, a treasure with explosive political significance in the modern world.
For both Simon and Sagan the stakes are high, the goal intensely personal, and the consequences of opposing either man potentially catastrophic. On a perilous quest from Florida to Vienna to Prague and finally to the mountains of Jamaica, the two men square off in a dangerous game. Along the way, both of their lives will be altered - and everything we know about Christopher Columbus will change.
As a special bonus, this audiobook download also includes a recording of the short story "The Admiral's Mark," read by Scott Brick.

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What the Critics Say

"As always with Steve Berry, you're educated about significant things while your knuckles are turning white and the pages are flying by." (New York Times best-selling author David Baldacci)
"Berry raises this genre's stakes." (The New York Times)
"Steve Berry writes with the self-assured style of a veteran." (New York Times best-selling author Dan Brown)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

I Enjoyed This Ride

This was my first Steve Berry novel and I enjoyed it! I enjoyed it despite Scott Brick, (Brick has ruined more audio books for me than any other reader) and I almost didn’t get it because of him, but the premise was intriguing enough – I mean, who ever really thinks about Columbus? I didn’t, but I love this type of historical fiction because it inspires me to think about the past in new and interesting ways… and the next time I see a Columbus biography in the bookstore I just might pick it up and flip through it!

The writing and storytelling here is more solid than anything from Dan Brown, but the two main characters, Tom and his daughter Alle, are a bit melodramatic – we meet Tom just as he is about to commit suicide over an apparent mistake he made some years earlier. He is interrupted by a man with a video showing his daughter being held captive by a couple of guys with rude hands who threaten to do worse to her if Tom doesn’t agree to have his father exhumed, and with him, the bad guys hope, a secret of history and religion that links Columbus and ancient Judaism to the New World! This sets Tom and Alle on a world tour adventure to discover the ultimate secret before the bad guys. The catch? Alle Does Not like or trust her father, and Tom needs to get over himself and man-up if he’s going to win this one.

Berry packs a lot into this book – the father/daughter conflict, secret sects, a Jamaican crime lord, historical flashbacks and “fun facts” about Columbus, Judaism and Jamaica – but he keeps things moving briskly enough that not even Brick’s quavering voice and clipped cadence can slow things down.

I think I'm a new Berry fan.
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- Cidney

I second the 'Meh" - disappointing and boring.

What did you like best about The Columbus Affair? What did you like least?

Before reading I had high hopes based on the authors prior books and the good narator. The story and the characters were just washed out versions of Berry's other books and characters. You couldn't like or really dislike any of them, they all lacked enough substance to generate any feeling. Weak plot, weak characters, I feel like I a wasted a credit because I expected much better. I get the whole flawed hero as a main character but these charaters were just boring, and the daughter as described by her backstory was educated, religious, divorced, a grown women but came across in the rest of the book as a contradication behaving more like a college student, immature, naive, whiny. I'd give this book a pass unless it was on sale.


How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

it lacked the thriller aspect, it just felt like a watered down version of the other (Malone) novels


What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

Scoot Brick is usally very good, but he sounded very monotone and unenthusiastic, it only added to the lack interest of the story


If this book were a movie would you go see it?

Nope


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- p

Book Details

  • Release Date: 05-15-2012
  • Publisher: Random House Audio