The Cabinet of Curiosities : Pendergast

  • by Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child
  • Narrated by Jonathan Marosz
  • Series: Pendergast
  • 17 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Book 3 in the series. In an ancient tunnel underneath New York City a charnel house is discovered. Inside are 36 bodies all murdered and mutilated more than a century ago. While FBI agent Pendergast investigates the old crimes, identical killings start to terrorize the city. The nightmare has begun. Again.

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Customer Reviews

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UNABRIDGED---AT LAST!

When the Audible abridged version of this book was released in 2002, I was excited because I had read the print version and knew it to be a wonderful story. It is one of my favorite Pendergast novels. Really enjoyable due to the excellent narration of Rene Auberjonois. However, I knew it lacked somewhat because of the abridgement.

A lot of us were really disappointed that we had not been offered an unabridged version--but here it is. I was a little hesitant because they are using a new narrator, Jonathan Marosz. I went for it anyway, and am glad I did. He isn't Rene, but he does a good job of creating the individual voices, and I found his subtle affect very pleasing after I got used to it.

THE CABINET OF CURIOSITIES is so much fun to listen to because it is classic Pendergast. He blackmails, manipulates, and smooth talks his way through any situation. A continuous thorn in the side of the "authority figures" he is a true friend to the regular folks, and has a huge array of contacts he can call on when needed.

Pendergast is attempting to solve the mystery of 36 people who were murdered and buried about a hundred years ago--their bones were found when a new building site is being cleared in New York. We go back in time to the world of the 19th Century -where some made money by putting strange oddities on display - and calling them Cabinets of Curiosities. Some were real, but some were contrived to make the displays as gruesome as possible (like sewing two lamb heads on one body.) The murderer had his own Cabinet at the time, which he used for more than one purpose---

One disappointment--In this book there is no D'Agosta- who I kind of missed. Pendergast does enlist the aid of another New York policeman, however, and also an Archeologist from the New York Museum of Natural History. Both good characters!

A reporter, Bill Smithback, is writing a story about the murder victims-with details about how they were killed-- and soon afterward, current day murders start occurring which are so similar to the old one's, they could have been committed by the same person. Except, of course, there is no way he could be alive today-or could he?? This story weaves us back and forth through the past and present, as Pendergast attempts to solve the mystery. However, the method of these murders is so unique, that it is hard to believe this is a "copy cat killer." To say more would spoil the surprise--


Truly an enjoyable book. Edge of the seat type thriller. Very recommended!


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- Jacqueline "."

DrBB

The description "formulaic but fun" pretty much covers all of Preston & Childs, but that's fine--I don't listen to these expecting to be challenged, just entertained. My one complaint here has to do with the narration. Fine as Rene Auberjenois's work has been in the others of this series I was not put off when I saw that there was a new narrator for this entry, but it was not until I was some "pages" into this one that I began to question my purchase.

Mr Marosz has a very distracting habit of arbitrarily, and so far as I can tell illogically choosing to end some sentences on a rising tone, which I found increasingly annoying as the narrative progressed. Without a printed text in front of you, a rising tone suggests a comma or question mark not a period, so this verbal tic ends up constituting a series of syntactical miscues randomly strewn about the text that the listener has to keep stumbling over. I'm not sure what he imagines it adds to the listening experience--variety maybe?--but I found it irritating at best and at times it actively interfered with comprehension.

Dear Mr Marosz: make life easier on your listeners--when you come to a period, please let your inflection drop like any normal reader would!
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- Lois

Book Details

  • Release Date: 12-14-2012
  • Publisher: Hachette Audio