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Publisher's Summary

Only hours after Holmes and Russell return from solving one murky riddle on the moor, another knocks on their front door...literally. It's a mystery that begins during the Great War, when Gabriel Hughenfort died amidst scandalous rumors that have haunted the family ever since. But it's not until Holmes and Russell arrive at Justice Hall, a home of unearthly perfection set in a garden modeled on Paradise, that they fully understand the irony echoed in the family motto, Justicia fortitudo mea est. A trail of ominous clues comprise a mystery that leads from an English hamlet to the city of Paris to the wild prairie of the New World. The trap is set, the game is afoot; but can Holmes and Russell catch an elusive killer, or has the murderer caught them?
©2002 Laurie R. King (P)2003 Recorded Books
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Critic Reviews

"A spellbinding mystery...superb." (The Washington Post)
"Consistently smart and poignant...[Conan Doyle] would probably approve." (Chicago Tribune)
"Audacious...Mary Russell is never less than fascinating company." (Los Angeles Times)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By S. Dale on 01-15-04

Best Holmes since Arthur Conan Doyle

This is my favorite detective series; the writing is superb and the narrator is perfect. This is currently the only one available on Audible, however, and although the book can stand on its own as a complete story, it is a richer experience to listen to them in chronological order. Assuming Audible will make the rest of the series available soon, the order is: Beekeeper's Apprentice, O Jerusalem, Monstrous Regiment of Women, A Book of Mary, The Moor, and Justice Hall last. (This is not the order in which they were written, but the order in which they take place.)

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35 of 35 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars
By Darjeeling on 08-12-07

Well done

I enjoy King's extension of the Holmes story very much. This happens to be one of my favorites of the series, revisiting as it does two characters I loved from an earlier novel, Ali and Mahmoud. Other reviewers complain that the book is uneventful, though perhaps they are misremembering Holmes stories as proceeding like James Bond novels. King doesn't rush the story's progression, certainly, but most readers will enjoy the slow building of tension and the sudden revelation of relationships, motives, and crime. The excerpts from the diary of a young soldier are fascinating. As for one reviewer's dismissal of the story as "unbelievable" because two Englishmen pass as Arabs, I wonder why they would bother with a spy/detective novel at all. Besides, there are plenty of people in the world who speak more than one language fluently, and who are at home in more than one culture.
My only quibble with this otherwise excellent performance was the narrator's rendition of a Canadian accent. One character in the novel is supposed to be from Toronto, but sounded like a speaker from Tennessee trying to imitate the speech of Manhattan.

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7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
5 out of 5 stars
By Michael on 09-21-09

Another triumphant entry in this wonderful series

The sheer chutzpah of Laurie R King's original conceit is breathtaking: an ageing Sherlock Holmes finds his soulmate when he literally stumbles across Mary Russell, a teenaged Anglo-American-Jewish orphan. Gauche, intellectual, ferociously brave and haunted by guilt, Russell becomes first Holmes's pupil-in-detection, then an almost equal partner - and his wife. Their cases take them to places as far apart as Rudyard Kipling's India and Conan Doyle's Dartmoor; 1918 Palestine and Dashiell Hammet's California. Justice Hall is a story of betrayal and tragedy rooted in the brutality of the trenches of World War One; it manages to be both sombre and hugely entertaining, and narrator Jenny Sterlin confirms her place as the incomparable voice of both Mary Russell and Holmes himself.

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

4 out of 5 stars
By Rhys on 06-25-09

Love the book, loath the voice

Well, that about says it, really. I've thoroughly enjoyed all of King's Mary Russell books - the characters are so well developed, they extend as flesh and blood beyond the text, with no sudden incongruous or anachronistic changes in their personalities. The plots twist and turn pleasingly. The language is evocative, the narration erudite, the attention to historic detail meticulous and lovingly drawn. So WHO decided to cast this narrator? The light, decriptive moments are delivered as if they're the most gothic and overwrought passages in Wuthering Heights, read by a hammy Cathy herself. The emphasis is ON all THE wrong words IN a sentence. And King's gorgeous Sherlock Holmes is made to sound like a constipated buffalo, for some unidentifiable reason speaking at half the speed of normal speech. If you can overlook these annoyences, with the redeeming quality of the novel this is still an excellent purchase, but you are likely to find yourself paraphrasing out loud how it should sound!

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1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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