Breach of Trust : Jason Kolarich

  • by David Ellis
  • Narrated by Luke Daniels
  • Series: Jason Kolarich
  • 12 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

Jason Kolarich has spent the past year struggling to recover from the horrific deaths of his wife and baby daughter. On the night of their deaths, Kolarich was at the office, awaiting a call from a confidential informant named Ernesto Ramirez — a call that never came. Kolarich blames himself not only for the deaths of his wife and child, but for the informant’s murder as well. He can’t bring back his family, but he can find out who killed Ramirez and bring the killer to justice.
Unfortunately, Kolarich’s guns-blazing approach to justice lands him smack in the middle of an FBI probe of a deeply corrupt governor and his cronies. To avoid jail, Kolarich must enter a world of wiretaps, double-dealing, and kickbacks, where he soon discovers that the murder of his informant was only the tip of the iceberg. This breach of trust runs up to the highest levels of power, and exposing it may drag Kolarich into the fight of his life.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

Kept me listening.

This was an interesting story that kept me listening. I like this genre so even though it may have had a familiar ring, I still liked it. This is the first time I've listened to this author. The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars is that it was too heavy on the profanity. I liked the characters and kept waiting to see how things would all work out. I wondered how the main character was going to get out of his apparent trouble by the end of the book. Worth a listen.
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- Mama bear

High Potential settles for the Middle Ground.

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

I don't feel like the time spent listening to this book is time that I regret, but it was very much a "once and done" listen for me. The narrative was interesting, but Ellis had a tendency to repeat himself. I was repeatedly given the main character's justifications for various actions several times. This can be helpful in a long novel, if appropriately spaced out, as a reminder to readers of events that may have seemed insignificant or were only briefly mentioned. But there were several instances of repeat information spaced only a chapter or two apart. To me, this feels like filler. Or like the author doesn't trust his audience.

Overall, the story was interesting and I wanted to know how it ended. But I also was able to piece together the mystery and still had about 2 or 3 hours to go before it was officially presented to me as a reader. That made those hours seem pretty hollow, and drained the excitement out of the narrative.


What about Luke Daniels’s performance did you like?

I am a huge fan of Daniels, and honestly picked this book up because I was looking for more of his work. He did a great job, though I admit the narrative didn't give him as much to work with as other performances I've listened to.


Any additional comments?

Overall, I will make the assumption that the issues that grated on me are just part of Ellis' style. So if you like his previous works, go ahead and pick this up. If you're a newcomer looking to scratch an itch, I would probably recommend that you look elsewhere.

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- ChemEngGuy

Book Details

  • Release Date: 02-03-2011
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio