Angels Flight : Harry Bosch

  • by Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by Peter Giles
  • Series: Harry Bosch
  • 12 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook

Publisher's Summary

An activist attorney is killed in a cute little L.A. trolley called Angels Flight, far from Harry Bosch's Hollywood turf. But the case is so explosive - and the dead man's enemies inside the L.A.P.D. are so numerous - that it falls to Harry to solve it. Now the streets are superheating. Harry's year-old Vegas marriage is unraveling. And the hunt for a killer is leading Harry to another high-profile L.A. murder case, one where every cop had a motive. The question is, did any have the guts?

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

One of best stories so far, average narrator

I started this series at the beginning, got sucked in, and I'm going the distance, knowing the road will be, as in most long series, uneven. Overall, they are well-written, with fairly intricate plot lines, good, not great, editing, and decent development of major characters. Lots of detailed but interesting police procedural; though I don't know how accurate it is, it sounds pretty believable to me.

I think this was one of the better tales from Connelly so far, but no thanks to the narrator. It would have been a really solid 4 stars with Hill. I've heard Peter Giles before when I read the Mickey Haller books, and likely some others. I don't like the Haller series as well--some of that may be due to the narrator. Giles 'reads' the books, Hill 'performs' them. Giles makes little distinction between characters, but mostly, it's that I don't like the voices he gives to either Bosch or Haller...they are kind of flat and monotonous and for some reason he seems to think they need to be breathy/raspy. (Other characters are not).


But. To be fair, while mediocre (not terrible by any means), Giles didn't keep me from enjoying this particular story; it was that interesting. I notice the next book is yet a different narrator; I'm keeping my fingers crossed, as I have become quite attached to Hieronymous Bosch and his story by now.
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- Pamela

Suffers from poor narration

So distracting is this narrator that it interferes with the enjoyment of the story. The narrator makes every sentence hyper-dramatic, and has the annoying habit of putting emphasis on the wrong words, and pauses that actually change the meaning of the written word. He also ends too many sentences almost like a question--raised tone. Harry is in a personal and professional quandary, and it is a tight plot. Because of the sheer circumstances of the plot, it isn't necessary to overly dramatize the characterizations. Also, this is another narrator that makes Harry unbearably gravelly-voiced.

When I could unscramble the ambiguous meanings of sentences with inappropriate pauses and inflections, the story was one of the more challenging for Harry, and creates a lot of background about how th LAPD had to evolve post Rodney King, the effects on the police and politics of the department.

I eventually enjoyed the book, in spite of the narration, but it did make me long for monotonous narration--which I ordinarily don't like.
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- Janels

Book Details

  • Release Date: 06-04-2013
  • Publisher: Hachette Audio