Regular price: $31.50

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
Select or Add a new payment method

Buy Now with 1 Credit

By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Buy Now for $31.50

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

On the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor comes a harrowing and enlightening look at the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, from National Book Award finalist Albert Marrin.
Just 75 years ago, the American government did something that most would consider unthinkable today: It rounded up over 100,000 of its own citizens based on nothing more than their ancestry and, suspicious of their loyalty, kept them in concentration camps for the better part of four years.
How could this have happened? Uprooted takes a close look at the history of racism in America and carefully follows the treacherous path that led one of our nation's most beloved presidents to make this decision. Meanwhile, it also illuminates the history of Japan and its own struggles with racism and xenophobia, which led to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, ultimately tying the two countries together.
Today America is still filled with racial tension, and personal liberty in wartime is as relevant a topic as ever. Moving and impactful, National Book Award finalist Albert Marrin's sobering exploration of this monumental injustice shines as bright a light on current events as it does on the past.
©2016 Albert Marrin (P)2016 Listening Library
Show More Show Less

Critic Reviews

"Historian Marrin (FDR and the American Crisis, 2015, etc.) writes with brutal honesty and conviction about a shameful period in American history. He constructs a detailed, well-researched narrative of horrific worldwide events leading up to the 'day of infamy.'" (Kirkus Reviews )
"As with Marrin's Flesh and Blood So Cheap (2011) and FDR and the American Crisis (2015), this is a prodigiously researched, indispensable work of history, generously illustrated with period photographs. It belongs on every library's shelves." (Booklist)
"Narrator Marc Cashman keeps the listener engaged.... Cashman's delivery is evenhanded and clear, and his steady pace allows the listener to absorb large chunks of information. His narration remains nonjudgmental as he moves to America's own history of racism, which facilitated the incarceration of American citizens of Japanese descent in internment camps." (AudioFile)
Show More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Ray Chanley on 12-24-16

Another must read book.

Although short, this book explores another dark chapter of racism in America and exposes many subtle ways it is advanced under the guise of security. Uprooted forces the reader to examine how far he would go and still feel comfortable in deciding on security vs liberty. Another book that should be required reading in American History classes.

Read More Hide me
See all Reviews