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Publisher's Summary

At a time when men and women were prepared to kill - and be killed - for their faith, the Protestant Reformation tore the Western world apart. Acclaimed as the definitive account of these epochal events, Diarmaid MacCulloch's award-winning history brilliantly recreates the religious battles of priests, monarchs, scholars, and politicians - from the zealous Martin Luther and his 95 Theses to the polemical John Calvin to the radical Igantius Loyola, from the tortured Thomas Cranmer to the ambitious Philip II.
Drawing together the many strands of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, and ranging widely across Europe and the New World, MacCulloch reveals as never before how these dramatic upheavals affected everyday lives - overturning ideas of love, sex, death, and the supernatural, and shaping the modern age.
©2003 Diarmaid MacCulloch (P)2017 Tantor
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Critic Reviews

"Superb...An essential work of religious history." (Kirkus)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful

By Eli Shem Tov on 05-15-17

Excellent

Why not use the table of contents from the print version and tie it to the audio?
The "chapters" for the audio are not related to the table of contents.

It would be MUCH easier to refer back to previous topics.

This applies to many/all Audible books.

Thanks.

See below

Introduction

PART I: A COMMON CULTURE

1. The Old Church, 1490-1517
Seeing Salvation in Church. The First Pillar: The Mass and Purgatory. Layfolk at Prayer. The Second Pillar: Papal Primacy. A Pillar Cracks: Politics and the Papacy. Church Versus Commonwealth?

2. Hopes and Fears, 1490-1517
Shifting Boundaries. The Iberian Exception. The Iberian Achievement: The Western Church Exported. New Possibilities: Paper and Printing. Humanism: A New World from Books. Putting Renewal into Practice. Reform or the Last Days? Erasmus: Hopes, Fulfilled, Fears Stilled?

3. New Heaven: New Earth, 1517-24
The Shadow of Augustine. Luther: A Good Monk, 1483-1517. An Accidental Revolution, 1517-21. Whose Revolution? 1521-22. Evangelical Challenges: Zwingli and Radicalism, 1521-22. Zürich and Wittenberg, 1522-24. The Years of Carnival, 1521-24

4. Wooing the Magistrate,1524-40
Europe’s Greatest Rebellion, 1524-25. Princely Churches or Christian Separation, 1525-30. The Birth of Protestantisms, 1529-33. Strassburg: New Rome or New Jerusalem? Kings and Reformers, 1530-40. A New King David? Münster and It’s Aftermath

5. Reunion Deferred: Catholic and Protestant, 1530-60
A Southern Revival. Ignatius Loyola and the Early Jesuits. Hopes for a Deal: The 1541-42 Crisis. A Council at Trent: The First Session, 1545-49. Calvin in Geneva: The Reformed Answer to Münster . Calvin and the Eucharist: Protestant Divisions Confirmed. Reformed Protestantism: Alternatives to Calvin, 1540-60

6. Reunion Scorned, 1547-70
Crisis for the Habsburgs, 1547-55. 1555: An Emperor’s Exhaustion, a Pope’s Obsession. A Catholic Recovery: England, 1553-58. 1558-59: Turning Points for Dynasties. The Last Session of the Council of Trent, 1561-63. Protestants in Arms: France and the Low Countries, 1562-70

PART II: EUROPE DIVIDED: 1570-1619

7. The New Europe Defined, 1569-72
Northern and Southern Religion. Tridentine Successes. The Catholic Defense of Christendom, 1565-71. Militant Northern Protestants, 1569-72. The Massacre of St. Bartholomew, 1572. Poland 1569-76: An Alternative Future? Protestantism and Providence

8. The North: Protestant Heartlands
Defining Lutheranism: Toward the Formula of Concord. The “Second Reformation” in Germany. Baltic Religious Contests: Poland-Lithuania and Scandinavia . The Northern Netherlands: Protestant Victory. The Northern Netherlands: The Arminian Crisis . A Reformed Success: Scotland. Elizabethan England: A Reformed Church?. Ireland: The Coming of the Counter-Reformation

9. The South: Catholic Heartlands
Italy: The Counter-Reformation’s Heart. Spain and Portugal: King Philip’s Church. The Counter-Reformation as World Mission

10. Central Europe: Religion Contested
The Empire and Habsburg Lands: A Shattered Church. Habsburgs, Wittlelsbachs, and a Catholic Recovery. Transylvania: A Reformed srael. France: Collapse of a Kingdom, 1572-98. France: A Late Counter-Reformation

11. Decision and Destruction, 1618-48

12. Coda: A British Legacy, 1600-1700
New English Beginnings: Richard Hooker and Lancelot Andrews. Early Stuart England: The Church’s Golden Age? War in Three Kingdoms, 1638-60. A Spectrum of Protestantisms, 1660-1700. American Beginnings

PART III: PATTERNS OF LIFE

13. Changing Times
Time Endings. Hearing God’s Voice. Fighting Antichrist: Idols. Fighting Antichrist: Witches

14. Death, Life, and Discipline
Negotiations with Death and Magic. Telling out the Word. Godly Discipline. A Spirit of Protestantism?

15. Love and Sex: Staying the Same
A Common Legacy. The Family in Society. The Fear of Sodomy

16. Love and Sex: Moving On
The “Reformation of Manners”. Catholicism, the Family and Celibacy. Protestantism and the Family. Choices in Religion

17. Outcomes
Wars of Reformation. Tolerating Difference. Crosscurrents: Humanism and Natural Philosophy. Crosscurrents: Judaism and Doubts. The Enlightenment and Beyond

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17 of 17 people found this review helpful


By SuperDave on 05-13-17

Really? That's your narrator?

I am a huge fan of Diarmaid MacCulloch and got this audio book as a supplement to reading the actual book. The narrator makes this impossible. She's the worse. Audible could not have gotten a worse voice to read this awesome work.

The book itself is an incredible tome, mixing an encyclopedic study of the reformation with great storytelling.

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13 of 13 people found this review helpful

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