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Publisher's Summary

From April 1964 to October 1965, some 52 million people from around the world flocked to the New York World's Fair, an experience that lives on in the memory of many individuals and in America's collective consciousness. Taking a perceptive look back at "the last of the great world's fairs," Lawrence R. Samuel offers a thought-provoking portrait of this seminal event and of the cultural climate that surrounded it. Samuel counters critics' assessments of the fair as the "ugly duckling" of global expositions. Opening five months after President Kennedy's assassination, the fair allowed millions to celebrate international brotherhood while the conflict in Vietnam came to a boil. Samuel's work charts the birth of the fair from inception in 1959 to demolition in 1966 and provides a broad overview of the social and cultural dynamics that led to the birth of the event. The book is published by Syracuse University Press.
©2007 Syracuse University Press (P)2014 Redwood Audiobooks
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Critic Reviews

"An overdue and well-deserved encomium to a largely denigrated chapter in [New York] city's history." ( The New York Times)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful
4 out of 5 stars
By Patrick Lynch on 06-03-18

Decent book on the Fair; weird narration

If you are interested in the 1964-1965 New York Word's Fair this is a pretty good book. Not as good as the excellent "Tomorrow-Land" on the social context of the Fair and its times, but "The End of the Innocence" has more of a focus on the Fair and the exhibits themselves. However, the narration is irritating. Narrator Richard Teimer seems constantly to be on the edge of a bemused chuckle, even in serious passages on the Kennedy assassination, protest demonstrations, etc. Not a crippling flaw for Fair lovers, but the weird performance mars a good story.

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5 out of 5 stars
By Jonathan on 05-11-18

The Narrator makes this awesome book even better!

This book is a hidden gem. If you have any interest in pop culture and history this book is great. It flows well and is a great listen but what is even better is the narrator. Its almost like listening to a podcast the narrations is so good. He has a great inflection and he even laughs during the reading. Great book - it sat in my wish list for a year until I got to it but I should have listened sooner. When you are done listening go on line and check out all the campy 60's film of the fair - the book is so well written and spot on - great book - I listen to a lot of dud's but this is the best book I have listen to!

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